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Excercising my trollerance at #EDUSOL

Submitted by gwolf on Fri, 10/20/2017 - 17:31

EDUSOL is back to life!

The online encounter I started together with my friend Pooka twelve years ago (Encuentro en Línea de Educación y Software Libre, Online Encounter of Education and Free Software) was held annually, between 2005 and 2011 if I recall correctly. Then, it went mute on a six year hiatus. This year it came back to life. Congratulations, Pooka, Sheik and crew!

Anyway, this is a multimodal online encounter — They managed to top the experience we had long time ago. As far as I can count, it now spans IRC, Telegram, Twitter, YouTube chat, plus a Google Hangouts → Youtube videoconference... And I am pushing for some other interaction modes to be yet added (i.e. using Meet Jitsi as well as Google Hangouts as the YouTube source)... ... ...

Anyway, between sessions and probably thanks to a typo, I was described as Siempre eres trolerante. I don't know if the person in question wanted to say I'm always trolling or always tolerant, but I like the mix, plus the rant part once it is translated to English.

So, yes, I enjoy being trollerant: I am a ranting troll, but I excercise tolerance towards others. Yay!

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Achievement unlocked - Made with Creative Commons translated to Spanish! (Thanks, @xattack!)

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 10/08/2017 - 23:05

I am very, very, very happy to report this — And I cannot believe we have achieved this so fast:

Back in June, I announced I'd start working on the translation of the Made with Creative Commons book into Spanish.

Over the following few weeks, I worked out the most viable infrastructure, gathered input and commitments for help from a couple of friends, submitted my project for inclusion in the Hosted Weblate translations site (and got it approved!)

Then, we quietly and slowly started working.

Then, as it usually happens in late August, early September... The rush of the semester caught me in full, and I left this translation project for later — For the next semester, perhaps...

Today, I received a mail that surprised me. That stunned me.

99% of translated strings! Of course, it does not look as neat as "100%" would, but there are several strings not to be translated.

So, yay for collaborative work! Oh, and FWIW — Thanks to everybody who helped. And really, really, really, hats off to Luis Enrique Amaya, a friend whom I see way less than I should. A LIDSOL graduate, and a nice guy all around. Why to him specially? Well... This has several wrinkles to iron out, but, by number of translated lines:

  • Andrés Delgado 195
  • scannopolis 626
  • Leo Arias 812
  • Gunnar Wolf 947
  • Luis Enrique Amaya González 3258

...Need I say more? Luis, I hope you enjoyed reading the book :-]

There is still a lot of work to do, and I'm asking the rest of the team some days so I can get my act together. From the mail I just sent, I need to:

  1. Review the Pandoc conversion process, to get the strings formatted again into a book; I had got this working somewhere in the process, but last I checked it broke. I expect this not to be too much of a hurdle, and it will help all other translations.
  2. Start the editorial process at my Institute. Once the book builds, I'll have to start again the stylistic correction process so the Institute agrees to print it out under its seal. This time, we have the hurdle that our correctors will probably hate us due to part of the work being done before we had actually agreed on some important Spanish language issues... which are different between Mexico, Argentina and Costa Rica (where translators are from).

    Anyway — This sets the mood for a great start of the week. Yay!

Call to Mexicans: Open up your wifi #sismo

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 09/19/2017 - 16:52

Hi friends,

~3hr ago, we just had a big earthquake, quite close to Mexico City. Fortunately, we are fine, as are (at least) most of our friends and family. Hopefully, all of them. But there are many (as in, tens) damaged or destroyed buildings; there have been over 50 deceased people, and numbers will surely rise until a good understanding of the event's strength are evaluated.

Mainly in these early hours after the quake, many people need to get in touch with their families and friends. There is a little help we can all provide: Provide communication.

Open up your wireless network. Set it up unencrypted, for anybody to use.

Refrain from over-sharing graphical content — Your social network groups don't need to see every video and every photo of the shaking moments and of broken buildings. Download of all those images takes up valuable time-space for the saturated cellular networks.

This advice might be slow to flow... The important moment to act is two or three hours ago, even now... But we are likely to have replicas; we are likely to have panic moments again. Do a little bit to help others in need!

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It was thirty years ago today... (and a bit more): My first ever public speech!

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 09/07/2017 - 13:35

I came across a folder with the most unexpected treasure trove: The text for my first ever public speech! (and some related materials)
In 1985, being nine years old, I went to the IDESE school, to learn Logo. I found my diploma over ten years ago and blogged about it in this same space. Of course, I don't expect any of you to remember what I wrote twelve years ago about a (then) twenty years old piece of paper!

I add to this very old stuff about Gunnar the four pages describing my game, Evitamono ("Avoid the monkey", approximately). I still remember the game quite vividly, including traumatic issues which were quite common back then; I wrote that «the sprites were accidentally deleted twice and the game once». I remember several of my peers telling about such experiences. Well, that is good if you account for the second system syndrome!

I also found the amazing course material for how to program sound and graphics in the C64 BASIC. That was a course taken by ten year old kids. Kids that understood that you had to write [255,129,165,244,219,165,0,102] (see pages 3-5) into a memory location starting at 53248 to redefine a character so it looked as the graphic element you wanted. Of course, it was done with a set of POKEs, as everything in C64. Or that you could program sound by setting the seven SID registers for each of the three voices containing low frequency, high frequency, low pulse, high pulse, wave control, wave length, wave amplitude in memory locations 54272 through 54292... And so on and on and on...

And as a proof that I did take the course:

...I don't think I could make most of my current BSc students make sense out of what is in the manual. But, being a kid in the 1980s, that was the only way to get a computer to do what you wanted. Yay for primitivity! :-D

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Made with Creative Commons: Over half translated, yay!

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 09/05/2017 - 14:05

An image speaks for a thousand words...

And our translation project is worth several thousand words!
I am very happy and surprised to say we have surpassed the 50% mark of the Made with Creative Commons translation project. We have translated 666 out of 1210 strings (yay for 3v1l numbers)!
I have to really thank Weblate for hosting us and allowing for collaboration to happen there. And, of course, I have to thank the people that have jumped on board and helped the translation — We are over half way there! Lets keep pushing!

Translation status

PS - If you want to join the project, just get in Weblate and start translating right away, either to Spanish or other languages! (Polish, Dutch and Norwegian Bokmål are on their way) If you translate into Spanish, *please* read and abide by the specific Spanish translation guidelines.

gwolf.blog.fork()

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 08/31/2017 - 10:54

Ohai,

I have recently started to serve as a Feature Editor for the ACM XRDS magazine. As such, I was also invited to post some general blog posts on XRDS blog — And I just started yesterday by posting about DebConf.

I'm not going to pull (or mention) each of my posts in my main blog, nor will I syndicate it to Planet Debian (where most of my readership comes from), although I did add it to my dlvr.it account (that relays my posts to Twitter and Facebook, for those of you that care about said services). This mention is a one-off thing.

So, if you want to see yet another post explaining what is DebConf and what is Debian to the wider public, well... Thate's what I came up with :)

[Update]: Of course, I wanted to thank Aigars Mahinovs for the photos I used on that post. Have you looked at them all? I spent a moste enjoyable time going through them :-]

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#DebConf17, Montreal • An evening out

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 08/07/2017 - 06:49

I have been in Montreal only for a day. Yesterday night, I left DebConf just after I finished presenting the Continuous Key-Signing Party introduction to go out with a long-time friend from Mexico and his family. We went to the Mont Royal park, from where you can have a beautiful city view:

What I was most amazed of as a Mexico City dweller is of the sky, of the air... Not just in this picture, but as we arrived, or later when a full moon rose. This city has beautiful air, and a very beautiful view. We later went for dinner to a place I heartfully recommend to other non-vegetarian attendees:

Portuguese-style grill. Delicious. Of course, were I to go past it, I'd just drive on (as it had a very long queue waiting to enter). The secret: Do your request on the phone. Make a short queue to pick it up. Have somebody in the group wait for a table, or eat at the nearby Parc Lafontaine. And... Thoroughly enjoy :-)

Anyway, I'm leaving for the venue, about to use the Bixi service for the first time. See you guys soon! (if you are at DebConf17, of course. And you should all be here!)

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DebConf17 Key Signing Party: You are here↓

Submitted by gwolf on Fri, 08/04/2017 - 19:23

I ran my little analysis program written last year to provide a nice map on the DebConf17 key signing party, based on the . What will you find if you go there?

  • A list of all the people that will take part of the KSP
  • Your key's situation relative to the KSP keyring

As an example, here is my location on the map (click on the graph to enlarge):

Its main use? It will help you find what clusters are you better linked with - And who you have not cross-signed with. Some people have signed you but you didn't sign them? Or the other way around? Whom should you approach to make the keyring better connected? Can you spot some attendees who are islands and can get some help getting better connected to our keyring? Please go ahead and do it!

PS— There are four keys that are mentioned in the DebConf17 Keysigning Party Names file I used to build this from: 0xE8446B4AC8C77261, 0x485E1BD3AE76CB72, 0x4618E4C700000173, E267B052364F028D. The public keyserver network does not know about them. If you control one of those keys and you want me to run my script again to include it, please send it to the keyservers and mail me. If your key is not in the keyservers, nobody will be able to sign it!

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Getting ready for DebConf17 in Montreal!

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 07/24/2017 - 22:56


(image shamelessly copied from Noodles' Emptiness)

This year I will only make it to DebConf, not to DebCamp. But, still, I am very very happy and excited as the travel date looms nearer! I have ordered some of the delicacies for the Cheese and Wine party, signed up for the public bicycle system of Montreal, and done a fair share of work with the Content Team; finally today we sent out the announcement for the schedule of talks. Of course, there are several issues yet to fix, and a lot of things to do before traveling... But, no doubt about this: It will be an intense week!

Oh, one more thing while we are at it: The schedule as it was published today does not really look like we have organized stuff into tracks — But we have! This will be soon fixed, adding some color-coding to make tracks clearer on the schedule.

This year, I pushed for the Content Team to recover the notion of tracks as an organizative measure, and as something that delivers value to DebConf as a whole. Several months ago, I created a Wiki page for the DebConf tracks, asking interested people to sign up for them. We currently have the following tracks registered:

Blends
Andreas Tille
Debian Science
Michael Banck
Cloud and containers
Luca Filipozzi
Embedded
Pending
Systems administration, automation and orchestation
Pending
Security
Gunnar Wolf

We have two tracks still needing a track coordinator. Do note that most of the tasks mentioned by the Wiki have already been carried out; what a track coordinator will now do is to serve as some sort of moderator, maybe a recurring talkmeister, ensuring continuity and probably providing for some commentary, giving some unity to its sessions. So, the responsibilities for a track coordinator right now are quite similar to what is expected for video team volunteers — but to a set of contiguous sessions.

If you are interested in being the track coordinator/moderator for Embedded or for Systems administration, automation and orchestation or even to share the job with any of the other, registered, coordinators, please speak up! Mail content@debconf.org and update the table in the Wiki page.

See you very soon in Montreal!

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Hey, everybody, come share the joy of work!

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 07/20/2017 - 00:17

I got several interesting and useful replies, both via the blog and by personal email, to my two previous posts where I mentioned I would be starting a translation of the Made With Creative Commons book. It is my pleasure to say: Welcome everybody, come and share the joy of work!

Some weeks ago, our project was accepted as part of Hosted Weblate, lowering the bar for any interested potential contributor. So, whoever wants to be a part of this: You just have to log in to Weblate (or create an account if needed), and start working!

What is our current status? Amazingly better than anything I have exepcted: Not only we have made great progress in Spanish, reaching >28% of translated source strings, but also other people have started translating into Norwegian Bokmål (hi Petter!) and Dutch (hats off to Heimen Stoffels!). So far, Spanish (where Leo Arias and myself are working) is most active, but anything can happen.

I still want to work a bit on the initial, pre-po4a text filtering, as there are a small number of issues to fix. But they are few and easy to spot, your translations will not be hampered much when I solve the missing pieces.

So, go ahead and get to work! :-D Oh, and if you translate sizeable amounts of work into Spanish: As my university wants to publish (in paper) the resulting works, we would be most grateful if you can fill in the (needless! But still, they ask me to do this...) authorization for your work to be a part of a printed book.

Reporting progress on the translation infrastructure

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 06/12/2017 - 23:28

Some days ago, I blogged asking for pointers to get started with the translation of Made with Creative Commons. Thank you all for your pointers and ideas! To the people that answered via private mail, via IRC, via comments on the blog. We have made quite a bit of progress so far; I want to test some things before actually sending a call for help. What do we have?

Git repository set up
I had already set up a repository at GitLab; right now, the contents are far from useful, they merely document what I have done so far. I have started talking with my Costa Rican friend Leo Arias, who is also interested in putting some muscle behind this translation, and we are both the admins to this project.
Talked with the authors
Sarah is quite enthusiastic about us making this! I asked her to hold a little bit before officially announcing there is work ongoing... I want to get bits of infrastructure ironed out first. Important — Talking with her, she discussed the tools they used for authoring the book. It made me less of a purist :) Instead of starting from something "pristine", our master source will be the PDF export of the Google Docs document.
Markdown conversion
Given that translation tools work over the bits of plaintext, we want to work with the "plainest" rendition of the document, which is Markdown. I found that Pandoc does a very good approximation to what we need (that is, introduces very little "ugly" markup elements). Converting the ODT into Markdown is as easy as:
$ pandoc -f odt MadewithCreativeCommonsmostup-to-dateversion.odt -t markdown > MadewithCreativeCommonsmostup-to-dateversion.md
Of course, I want to fine-tune this as much as possible.
Producing a translatable .po file
I have used Gettext to translate user interfaces; it is a tool very well crafted for that task. Translating a book is quite different: How and where does it break and join? How are paragraphs "strung" together into chapters, parts, a book? That's a task for PO 4 Anything (po4a). As simple as this:
po4a-gettextize -f text -m MadewithCreativeCommonsmostup-to-dateversion.md -p MadewithCreativeCommonsmostup-to-dateversion.po -M utf-8
I tested the resulting file with my good ol' trusty poedit, and it works... Very nicely!

What is left to do?

  • I made an account and asked for hosting at Weblate. I have not discussed this with Leo, so I hope he will agree ;-) Weblate is a Web-based infrastructure for collaborative text translation, provided by Debian's Michal Čihař. It integrates nicely with version control systems, preserves credit for each translated string (and I understand, but might be mistaken, that it understands the role of "editors", so that Leo and I will be able to do QA on the translation done by whoever joins us, trying to have a homogeneous-sounding result. I hope the project is approved for Weblate soon!
  • Work on reconstructing the book. One thing is to deconstruct, find paragraphs, turn them into translatable strings... And a very different one is to build a book again from there! I have talked with some people to help me get this in shape. It is basically just configuring Pandoc — But as I have never done that, any help will be most, most welcome!
  • Setting translation policies. What kind of language will we use? How will we refer to English names and terms? All that important stuff to give proper quality to our work
  • Of course, the long work itself: Performing the translations ☺

Made with Creative Commons: Starting a translation project

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 06/06/2017 - 12:06

Dear Lazyweb,

About a week ago, I learnt about the release of an interesting book by the fine people at Creative Commons: Made with Creative Commons. The book itself is, of course, CC BY-SA-licensed.

I downloaded it and started reading right away. Some minutes later, I ordered a dead-tree copy, which arrived a couple of days ago. (I'm linking to the publisher's page, but bought it from Amazon México... Shipping it from Denmark would not have been as cheap and fast, I guess).

Anyway, given my workplace, given the community I know, given I know something like this is much needed... I will start a Spanish translation of the content. There are at least two other people interested in participating, and I haven't yet publicized my intentions (this is the first public statement about it).

So, dear Lazyweb: What I need is a good framework for doing this. I started by creating a Git repository, and we were discussing to translate to Markdown (to later format according to the desired output) but then I thought... If we want the translation to be updateable, and to be able to properly accept other people's work, maybe a better format is warranted?

So, my current idea is to create a Markdown version for the English original, and find a way to shoehorn^Wseparate it by paragraphs and feed it to Gettext, which is the best translation framework I have used (but is meant for code translation, not for full-text)...

Dear lazyweb: What tools do you recommend me to use? Quite important to me: Are they Free tools? Are they easy to use by third-parties, maybe incorporating work via Git? Or, at least, via a Web front-end that allows me as a project lead to review and approve/fix/reject strings?

Thanks, lazyweb!

Open Source Symposium 2017

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 05/22/2017 - 12:21

I travelled (for three days only!) to Argentina, to be a part of the Open Source Symposium 2017, a co-located event of the International Conference on Software Engineering.

This is, all in all, an interesting although small conference — We are around 30 people in the room. This is a quite unusual conference for me, as this is among the first "formal" academic conference I am part of. Sessions have so far been quite interesting.
What am I linking to from this image? Of course, the proceedings! They managed to publish the proceedings via the "formal" academic channels (a nice hard-cover Springer volume) under an Open Access license (which is sadly not usual, and is unbelievably expensive). So, you can download the full proceedings, or article by article, in EPUB or in PDF...
...Which is very very nice :)
Previous editions of this symposium have also their respective proceedings available, but AFAICT they have not been downloadable.
So, get the book; it provides very interesant and original insights into our community seen from several quite novel angles!

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Starting a project on private and anonymous network usage

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 05/15/2017 - 11:43

I am starting a work with the students of LIDSOL (Laboratorio de Investigación y Desarrollo de Software Libre, Free Software Research and Development Laboratory) of the Engineering Faculty of UNAM:

We want to dig into the technical and social implications of mechanisms that provide for anonymous, private usage of the network. We will have our first formal work session this Wednesday, for which we have invited several interesting people to join the discussion and help provide a path for our oncoming work. Our invited and confirmed guests are, in alphabetical order:

  • Salvador Alcántar (Wikimedia México)
  • Sandino Araico (1101)
  • Gina Gallegos (ESIME Culhuacán)
  • Juliana Guerra (Derechos Digitales)
  • Jacobo Nájera (Enjambre Digital)
  • Raúl Ornelas (Instituto de Investigaciones Económicas)

  • As well as LIDSOL's own teachers and students.
    This first session is mostly exploratory, we should keep notes and decide which directions to pursue to begin with. Do note that by "research" we are starting from the undergraduate student level — Not that we want to start by changing the world. But we do want to empower the students who have joined our laboratory to change themselves and change the world. Of course, helping such goals via the knowledge and involvement of projects (not just the tools!) such as Tor.

On Dmitry Bogatov and empowering privacy-protecting tools

Submitted by gwolf on Fri, 04/14/2017 - 23:53

There is a thorny topic we have been discussing in nonpublic channels (say, the debian-private mailing list... It is impossible to call it a private list if it has close to a thousand subscribers, but it sometimes deals with sensitive material) for the last week. We have finally confirmation that we can bring this topic out to the open, and I expect several Debian people to talk about this. Besides, this information is now repeated all over the public Internet, so I'm not revealing anything sensitive. Oh, and there is a statement regarding Dmitry Bogatov published by the Tor project — But I'll get to Tor soon.

One week ago, the 25-year old mathematician and Debian Maintainer Dmitry Bogatov was arrested, accused of organizing riots and calling for terrorist activities. Every evidence so far points to the fact that Dmitry is not guilty of what he is charged of — He was filmed at different places at the times where the calls for terrorism happened.

It seems that Dmitry was arrested because he runs a Tor exit node. I don't know the current situation in Russia, nor his political leanings — But I do know what a Tor exit node looks like. I even had one at home for a short while.

What is Tor? It is a network overlay, meant for people to hide where they come from or who they are. Why? There are many reasons — Uninformed people will talk about the evil wrongdoers (starting the list of course with the drug sellers or child porn distributors). People who have taken their time to understand what this is about will rather talk about people for whom free speech is not a given; journalists, political activists, whistleblowers. And also, about regular people — Many among us have taken the habit of doing some of our Web surfing using Tor (probably via the very fine and interesting TAILS distribution — The Amnesiac Incognito Live System), just to increase the entropy, and just because we can, because we want to preserve the freedom to be anonymous before it's taken away from us.

There are many types of nodes in Tor; most of them are just regular users or bridges that forward traffic, helping Tor's anonymization. Exit nodes, where packets leave the Tor network and enter the regular Internet, are much scarcer — Partly because they can be quite problematic to people hosting them. But, yes, Tor needs more exit nodes, not just for bandwidth sake, but because the more exit nodes there are, the harder it is for a hostile third party to monitor a sizable number of them for activity (and break the anonymization).

I am coincidentially starting a project with a group of students of my Faculty (we want to breathe life again into LIDSOL - Laboratorio de Investigación y Desarrollo de Software Libre). As we are just starting, they are documenting some technical and social aspects of the need for privacy and how Tor works; I expect them to publish their findings in El Nigromante soon (which means... what? ☺ ), but definitively, part of what we want to do is to set up a Tor exit node at the university — Well documented and with enough academic justification to avoid our network operation area ordering us to shut it down. Lets see what happens :)

Anyway, all in all — Dmitry is in for a heavy time. He has been detained pre-trial at least until June, and he faces quite serious charges. He has done a lot of good, specialized work for the whole world to benefit. So, given I cannot do more, I'm just speaking my mind here in this space.

[Update] Dmitry's case has been covered in LWN. There is also a statement concerning the arrest of Dmitry Bogatov by the Debian project. This case is also covered at The Register.

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