gwolf's blog

Mozilla: So our communitary echobox *does* resound with social issues

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 04/03/2014 - 20:16

I woke up to the news that, after a very short tenure, Brendan Eich steps down as the Mozilla CEO.

Why? Because of the community outcry. Because some years ago, Eich pubilcly supported (and donated funds) the ban of any kind of marriages in California that were not between a man and a woman. The world has advanced enormously in this regard in the last years/decades, and so many individuals and organizations opposed and announced they would boycott Mozilla that either him or Mozilla could not stand the pressure anymore.

So, of course, it's sad the person had to resign. Many people talked about freedom of speech, freedom of harbouring his own personal opinion — But when it comes to the rights of minorities, particularly of minorities that have suffered such hard prejudice and abuse as the gay, lesbian and all the other non-orthodox sexual- and gender- orientations, righting a wrong is much more important than preserving an individual's freedom of opinion. Besides, it's not just thinking or talking about something — The concrete proposition Eich supported (and eventually made him resign) is about bringing the life of thousands of people to a hellish state of uncertainty, and going back to not having a way for the society to legally recognize their way of being, their love, their lifes.

But anyway — What prompts me into writing this is that, once again, the Free Software (and related denominations) community has shown that a set of core values, seemingly shared by a very large amount of our own people with no coordination or correlation with what conforms us as a community (and thus, being emergent traits), are strong enough to create a critical mass, to achieve cohesion. And that ours is not just a technical community of people writing software at all layers of the stack, but –first and foremost– is a group of social activists, committed to making the world better.

I will quote from Matthew Garrett's post on this topic, clearly more contundent and thorough that what I'm trying to come up with:

The Mozilla Manifesto discusses individual liberty in the context of use of the internet, not in a wider social context. Brendan's appointment was very much in line with the explicit aims of both the Foundation and the Corporation - whatever his views on marriage equality, nobody has seriously argued about his commitment to improving internet freedom. So, from that perspective, he should have been a fine choice.

But that ignores the effect on the wider community. People don't attach themselves to communities merely because of explicitly stated goals - they do so because they feel that the community is aligned with their overall aims. The Mozilla community is one of the most diverse in free software, at least in part because Mozilla's stated goals and behaviour are fairly inspirational. People who identify themselves with other movements backing individual liberties are likely to identify with Mozilla. So, unsurprisingly, there's a large number of socially progressive individuals (LGBT or otherwise) in the Mozilla community, both inside and outside the Corporation.

A CEO who's donated money to strip rights from a set of humans will not be trusted by many who believe that all humans should have those rights. It's not just limited to individuals directly affected by his actions - if someone's shown that they're willing to strip rights from another minority for political or religious reasons, what's to stop them attempting to do the same to you? Even if you personally feel safe, do you trust someone who's willing to do that to your friends? In a community that's made up of many who are either LGBT or identify themselves as allies, that loss of trust is inevitably going to cause community discomfort.

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DrupalCamp Mexico City: April 23-25

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 04/03/2014 - 08:30

We are organizing a DrupalCamp in Mexico City!

DrupalCamp Mexico City logo

As a Drupal user, I have so far attended two DrupalCamps (one in Guadalajara, Mexico, and one in Guatemala, Guatemala). They are –as Free Software conferences usually are– great, informal settings where many like-minded users and developers meet and exchange all kinds of contacts, information, and have a good time.

Torre de Ingeniería

Torre de Ingeniería, UNAM

This year, I am a (minor) part of the organizing team. DrupalCamp will be held in Torre de Ingeniería, UNAM — Just by Facultad de Ingeniería, where I teach. A modern, beautiful building in Ciudad Universitaria.

Talks, tracks

So, who is this for? You can go look at the accepted sessions, you will find there is a lot of ground. Starting from the very introduction to how Drupal is structured and some tips on how to work with it (delivered by yours truly), through workflows for specific needs, to strong development-oriented talks. The talks are structured along four tracks: "Training", "Theming", "Development", "Business" and "SymfonyDay".

"SymfonyDay"? Yes.

Drupal is a fast-evolving Free Software project. Most users are currently using versions 6 and 7, which are as different between each other as day and night... But the upcoming Drupal 8 brings even greater changes. One of the most interesting changes I can see is that Drupal will now be based on a full MVC framework, Symfony. One of the days of our DrupalCamp will be devoted to Symfony (dubbed the Symfony Day).

...And... Again, just look at the list of talks. You will find a great amount of speakers interested in coming here. Not just from Mexico City. Not just from Mexico. Not just from Latin America. I must say I am personally impressed.

Sponsors!

Of course, as with any volunteer-run conferences: We are still looking for sponsors. We believe being a DrupalCamp sponsor will greatly increase your brand visibility in the community you want to work with. There are still a lot of expenses to cover to make this into all that we want. And surely, you want to be a part of this great project. There are many sponsor levels — Surely you can be part of it!

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Getting rid of rodents

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 03/27/2014 - 12:28

So a good friend of mine talked about something in the debian-private mailing list. And we should not disclose that something outside such a sensible space without his approval.

But Jakub is right. Once the discussion goes over to only messages talking about non-private stuff, the discussion should be moved to a non-private area. After all, we will not hide problems yada yada, right?

So, not knowing where in the Debian lists this should go to, it will land on my blog, reformatting mail to make sense in this media:

Luca Filipozzi dijo [Wed, Mar 26, 2014 at 03:36:49PM +0000]:

Or don't use a mouse. When I started getting shoulder strain from using a mouse too much, I switched to an Adesso touchpad keyboard and was very happy with the positive outcome. I'm a touch (that's punny) less efficient with the touchpad compared to a mouse, but the lack of permanent injury and ongoing pain is worth it.

Right. I also have this keyboard (same brand even, different model). The keyboard is not that good (keys are not as smooth as in my previous, stock-Dell keyboard), but not having to move my right hand just to feed the rodent has made my back way way happier. I even feel better using a trackpad than a mouse (mabye because I use too much my netbook?).

Luca, just out of curiosity: Did you ever manage to recognize the keyboard under the Synaptics driver, or to get it running under ChordMiddle or Emulate3Buttons? I had to fall to a ugly hack, mapping the "XF86Search" key to the middle button by telling my window manager (i3) to "bindsym X86Search exec xdotool click 2".

[ this can be declassified at any time ]

my contributions to this thread too...

my contribution unclassified, also

My classifications remain contributed. Do as you will with my bits of this message.

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Trying to get Blender to run in the CuBox-i (armhf): Help debugging Python!

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 03/15/2014 - 22:10

As I posted some weeks ago, I have been playing with my CuBox-i4Pro, a gorgeous little ARM machine by SolidRun, built around an iMX6 system-on-a-chip.

My first stabs at using it resulted in my previous post on how to get a base, almost-clean Debian distribution to run (Almost? Yes, the kernel requires some patches not yet accepted upstream, so I'm still running with a patched 3.0.35-8 kernel). After writing this step by step instructions, I followed them and built images ready to dd to a SD card and start running (available at my people.debian.org space.

Now, what to do with this little machine? My version is by no means a limited box: 4 ARM cores, 2GB RAM make a quite decent box. In my case, this little machine will most likely be a home storage server with little innovation. However, the little guy is a power server, at only 3W consumption. I wanted to test its capabilities to do some number crunching and aid some of my friends — The obvious candidate is building a Blender render farm. Right, the machines might be quite underpowered, but they are cheap (and look gorgeous!), so at least it's worth playing a bit!

Just as a data point, running on an old hard disk (and not on my very slow SD card), the little machine was able to compile the Blender sources into a Debian package in 89m13.537s, that is, 5353 seconds. According to the Debian build logs (yes, for a different version, I tried with the version in Wheezy and in a clean Wheezy system), the time it took to build on some other architectures' build daemons was 1886s on i386, 1098s on PowerPC, 2003s on AMD64, 11513s on MIPS and 27721 on ARMHF. That means, my little machine is quite slower than desktop systems, but not unbearably so.

But sadly, I have hit a wall, and have been unable to do any further progress. Blender segfaults at startup under the Debian armhf architecture. I have submitted bug report #739194 about this, but have got no replies to it yet. I did get the great help from my friends in the OFTC #debian-arm channel, but they could only help up to a given point. It seems the problem lies in the Python interpreter in armhf, not in Blender itself... But I cannot get much further either. I'm sending this as a blog post to try to get more eyeballs on my problem — How selfish, right? :-)

So, slightly going over the bug report, blender just dies at startup:

  1. $ blender -b -noaudio
  2. Segmentation fault

After being told that strace is of little help when debugging this kind of issues, I went via gdb. A full backtrace pointed to what feels like the right error point:

  1. (gdb) bt full
  2. #0 0x2acd8cce in PyErr_SetObject ()
  3. from /usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libpython3.3m.so.1.0
  4. No symbol table info available.
  5. #1 0x2acd8c9a in PyErr_Format ()
  6. from /usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libpython3.3m.so.1.0
  7. No symbol table info available.
  8. #2 0x2ac8262c in PyType_Ready ()
  9. from /usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libpython3.3m.so.1.0
  10. No symbol table info available.
  11. #3 0x2ac55052 in _PyExc_Init ()
  12. from /usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libpython3.3m.so.1.0
  13. No symbol table info available.
  14. #4 0x2ace95e2 in _Py_InitializeEx_Private ()
  15. from /usr/lib/arm-linux-gnueabihf/libpython3.3m.so.1.0
  16. No symbol table info available.
  17. #5 0x00697898 in BPY_python_start (argc=3, argv=0x7efff8d4)
  18. at /build/blender-dPxPUD/blender-2.69/source/blender/python/intern/bpy_interface.c:274
  19. py_tstate = 0x0
  20. py_path_bundle = 0x0
  21. program_path_wchar = L"/usr/bin/blender", '\000' <repeats 1007 times>
  22. #6 0x0044a1ca in WM_init (C=C@entry=0x1d83220, argc=argc@entry=3,
  23. argv=argv@entry=0x7efff8d4)
  24. at /build/blender-dPxPUD/blender-2.69/source/blender/windowmanager/intern/wm_init_exit.c:176
  25. No locals.
  26. #7 0x0042e4de in main (argc=3, argv=0x7efff8d4)
  27. at /build/blender-dPxPUD/blender-2.69/source/creator/creator.c:1597
  28. C = 0x1d83220
  29. syshandle = 0x1d8a338
  30. ba = 0x1d8a840
  31. (gdb)

I'm not pasting here the full bug history (go to the bug report for the full information!), but it does point me to this being a problem in Python-land: It points to something not found at line 59 of Python/errors.c. And what I understand from that line is that some kind of unknown exception is thrown, and the Python interpreter does not now what to do with it. The check done at line 59 is the if (exception != NULL ** ....:

  1. void
  2. PyErr_SetObject(PyObject *exception, PyObject *value)
  3. {
  4. PyThreadState *tstate = PyThreadState_GET();
  5. PyObject *exc_value;
  6. PyObject *tb = NULL;
  7.  
  8. if (exception != NULL &&
  9. !PyExceptionClass_Check(exception)) {
  10. PyErr_Format(PyExc_SystemError,
  11. "exception %R not a BaseException subclass",
  12. exception);
  13. return;
  14. }

So... Dear lazyweb: Any pointers on where to go on from here?

kthxbye.

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Pushing keyring updates. Let us bury your old 1024D key!

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 03/03/2014 - 13:09

I have just pushed our pseudo-monthly batch of keyring updates to Debian. I am happy to inform you that, while the situation described in Clint Adams' interesting assessment of the state of the Debian keyring (and the quite constructive conversation that followed) still holds, and we still have way too many weak (1024D) keys in the Debian keyring, we got a noticeable effect as a result of said thread: 20 key upgrade requests in somewhat over a one week period! (mostly from DDs, with two from DMs IIRC).

So, for any DD or DM reading this and not following the debian-project list where this thread took place:

As keyring maintainers, we no longer consider 1024D keys to be trustable. We are not yet mass-removing them, because we don't want to hamper the project's work, but we definitively will start being more aggressively deprecating their use. 1024D keys should be seen as brute-force vulnerable nowadays. Please do migrate away from them into stronger keys (4096R recommended) as soon as possible.

If you have a key with not-so-many active DD signatures (with not-so-many ≥ 2) waiting to get it more signed, stop waiting and request the key replacement.

If you do not yet have a 4096R key, create a new one as soon as possible and get some signatures on it. Once ≥2 DDs have signed it, please request us to replace your old key. If you cannot get to meet two DDs in person, please talk to us and we will find out what to do.

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Finally: A student once again

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 01/21/2014 - 21:47

Formally, today is my first day as a student on a formal, scholarized institution — Basically for the first time in almost twenty years!

Yes, those that know me know that I aspire to live the life of academia. I have worked at public universities for almost all of my adult life (between 1997 and 1999 I worked at a local ISP and at a private school), and have had a minor academic position («Técnico Académico») for almost ten years. And not having a proper degree limited me from pursuing anything further.

Then, in early 2010 I presented the written exam. By late 2010, the corresponding oral exam. That allowed me to get my formal diploma in December 2010. By the end of 2011, I requested to be a teacher in the Engineering Faculty of UNAM, and started teaching Operating Systems a year ago, in January 2012.

So, a good advance in the last few years... But I know that if I just sit here, I won't be able to advance my position towards really entering the Sacred Halls of Academia. And there are some rituals I have to comply with. One of those rituals is... Devoting some long time to studying under the formal structures.

Ok, so I'm finally a postgraduate student — I have enrolled in Especialidad en Seguridad Informática y Tecnologías de la Información, a short (one year) postgraduate program in ESIME Culhuacán, of Instituto Politécnico Nacional (a small campus of Mexico's second-largest university).

Some friends have asked me, why am I starting with a Specialization and not a Masters degree. Some simple reasons: Just as when I went to Tijuana in 2010 to do my written exam, once I got and started with the paperwork, I didn't want to let it go — If I postpone it, I will probably lose the push to do it by May-July, when the Masters admission process starts. Also, this specialization can be linked with the masters degree on the same topic given at the same campus. This program is one year long, and the masters two — But having them both takes 2.5 years. So, not such a bad deal after all. And finally, because, after such a long time without being scholarized, I fear not having an easy time getting to grips with the discipline. I can commit to overworking myself for a year — If it's too much for me, I'll just stay with that degree and give up. I expect to like it and continue... But it's also a safe bet :-)

Now, there has to be a downside to picking up this path: Of course, my free time will be harshly reduced. I have reduced my Debian involvement in the last year, as I devoted a huge chunk of my time to teaching and book-writing... This year... We shall see what happens. I can for now only confirm what I have said publicly but inside our team only: I have requested to my peers and to our DPL to step down as a DebConf chair. I love organizing DebConf, but I don't want to be formally committed to a position I just cannot fulfill as I did when I started with it. As for package maintenance, by far most of my packges are team maintained, and those that are not are relatively easy to keep track of. And of course, I'll keep an eye on my keyring-maint duties as well — Will even try to link that work with what I do at school!

Anyway, lets see what comes now!

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[review] Packt's «Instant Haml»

Submitted by gwolf on Wed, 01/08/2014 - 14:34

Packt Publishing sent me Krzysztof Nikiński's «Instant Haml» to do a short blog review... Thing is, and those who read me know, I cannot write short reviews ;-) So lets see how this goes.

Packt's Instant series

First, as for the format this book follows and the series it fits in: They are very short books. I was the tech reviewer for their «Instant Debian – Build a Web Server», and when I opened it for the first time, I thought I had received only the first chapter. This series' motto is Short | Fast | Focused — so, yes, the books are ~50 pages long, with ample margins and many big screenshots. I told the editors I was quite unsure about the value this kind of publications add, as they are very similar to online tutorials, but given they have so many books in this series (printed and electronic), there must be a market for them. They surely know their business better than me!

There is one other detail regarding the publisher I'll stick in this section, although it is not specific to their Instant series: I do most of my reading in my Kindle. Packt seems to have chosen to specify a very small font for their texts. Besides the two books mentioned, I also have their Object Oriented JavaScript book. For all of the other books I read, I use the smallest font setting. Packt books in mobi format (what they present as Amazon format in their web site) are basically illegible without bumping up the font size through the roof. As I understand it, publishers should use industry-wide default sizes, and let the reader adjust their reading experience. Yes, books of technical nature (such as Packt's) often benefit from having more displayed information than what an ebook reader normally shows... But that's for me to decide! And no, this is not a Kindle-specific glitch: I also get a similar experience when opening it from Calibre.

And as for the book...

I am a long-time Haml convert/fan; I packaged its Ruby implementation for Debian (and should update it soon :-/ as new versions have appeared), the corresponding Emacs Lisp mode, and I use it for basically all of my static HTML sites and Ruby-based Web systems.

Haml is a great templating language, meant to make dynamic HTML generation leaner and easier. It is a clean and elegant technology, and can clearly sell itself. And the project webpage has very good documentation, ranging from a short tutorial and a full API documentation for people to contribute to the project.

The first part of this book, of course, covers the "why is Haml so great?" part, presenting the basic equivalences with HTML. In my opinion, the book could be structured a bit differently and would generate a stronger following. Why? Because, even given that Haml is greatly benefited from its Ruby integration and has many hooks to be tightly integrated in a Rails workflow, it can also be used by people who don't want to do Ruby.

I have some static websites that are just a bunch of Haml files, compiled by a very simple Makefile and calling the haml command from the shell. I think there would be some value in presenting this invocation before learning how to call it from the Gems environment (i.e. bundle install).

Using Haml as a standalone tool is only presented almost as an appendix ("Using HAML outside of Rails" section). Even more so if the author presents four different static-site solutions (probably more non-programmer-friendly than my trusty Makefile).

Oh, and this little section uses the (old? obsolete?) uppercase HAML notation for the project's name instead of the now-standard Haml.

Dirty screenshots

About the screenshots presented in this first section (and I refer mainly to the scaffolding examples), they are meant to show how easy things are, but have an important stylistic mistake: Terminals with transparency might look cool (I hate using them, but then again I'm a very boring person when it comes to my computer habits ;-) ), but transparencies have no place in a book (be it printed or e-book), as the images appear very uncrisp. In the Kindle, they just seemed dirty — Now that I'm browsing the PDF from my desktop, I see that the screenshot in "Step 1" has a photo of Earth from space behind the terminal, and even worse, in "Step 2" it is shown over a Web page detailing the installation! These elements are just distracting, and the text would be much cleaerer if it were presented typeset just as a regular code fragment. Opening many of those screenshots in the Kindle was plain useless.

Editor integration

It is perfectly clear from this text that the author strongly prefers Sublime Text, sometimes uses TextMate, and has just heard reports that Haml has some support in Vim, Rubymine, Emacs and Coda. Of course, devoting a full page (as it is for the first case) for each editor would be out of proportion for this size of book... I just felt the imbalance too big, specially given that most editors will sport approximately the same feature set.

Text redundancy

If the Instant series is about making short books, I would expect them to be loaded with easy to follow content (as they are), but free of repetition. I felt, however, a large chunk of step 1 of the "Quick start" chapter to be repeated with the the first section of the "Top 6 features" chapter. Yes, the second one adds some depth, but very little. Still, in the later parts of this "Top 6 features" chapter, a more thorough explanation could be used for the Filters, Multiline attributes/code/strings and helpers and extensions sections. It seems the author was on a hurry trying to get it finished, as it is barely explained — Explaining a bit more deeply would surely benefit readers.

Wrapping up

Reading my review, I'm mostly talking about negative issues. IMO, the book is not excellent, but it is clearly not bad. Specially given it fits very well the format for which it was designed. There are many items that could be fixed, and I hope some of them can be fixed (i.e. the screenshots) before the book goes to print — If I understand Packt's page correctly, it is currently only available as ebook, contrary to most of the Instant series' titles.

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For people in Mexico: Workshop next Wednesday! Video editing from the command line (by Chema Serralde, @joseserralde)

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 12/05/2013 - 20:56

(Yes, yes... Maybe I should post in Spanish.. But hey, gotta keep consistecy in my blog!)

General, public, open invitation

Are you in Mexico City, or do you plan to be next Wednesday (December 11)?

Are you interested in video edition? In Free Software?

I will have the pleasure to host at home the great Chema Serralde, a good friend, and a multifacetic guru both in the technical and musical areas. He will present a workshop: Video editing from the command line.

I asked Chema for an outline of his talk, but given he is a busy guy, I will basically translate the introduction he prepared for this same material in FSL Vallarta, held two weeks ago.

With the help of the commandline, you can become a multimedia guru. We will edit a video using just a terminal. This skill will surprise your friends — and your couple.

But the most important is that this knowledge is just an excuse to understand step by step what does a video CODEC mean, what is a FORMAT, and how video and audio editors work; by using this knowledge, you will be able to set the basis for multimedia editing, without the promises and secrets of propietary editors.

How much does my file weigh and why? How to improve a video file's quality? Why cannot I read my camera's information from GNU/Linux?

By the end of this workshop, we well see how some libraries help you develop your first audio and video application, what are their main APIs and uses.

Logistics

Everybody is welcome to come for free, no questions asked, no fees collected. I can offer coffee for all, but if you want anything else to eat/drink, you are welcome to bring it.

We do require you to reserve and confirm your place (mail me to my usual mail address). We have limited space, and I must set an absolute quota of 10 participants.

Some people hide their address... Mine is quite publicly known: Av. Copilco 233, just by Parque Hugo Margain, on the Northern edge of UNAM (Metro Copilco).

The course starts at 16:00, and lasts... As long as we make it last ;-)

So, that said... See you there! :-D

[update]: Chema sent me the list of topics he plans to cover. Copy/pasting from his mail, in Spanish:

TALLER RELÁMPAGO DE EDICIÓN AUDIOVISUAL EN LÍNEA DE COMANDO
José María Serralde Ruiz, facilitador

  1. Editando como cavernícola.
    1. Manipulación básica de archivos multimedia en entornos POSIX.
    2. Sé un Bash VJ (videojockey)
    3. Vaciando y entubando
  2. Editando como científico.
    1. Encabezados y fourcc
    2. 3 familias de CODECS de vídeo y sus patentes
    3. 3 famlias de CODECS de audio y sus patentes
    4. Muxers, demuxers y muxes.
  3. Editando como artista.
    1. Cajas de herramientas en software libre para procesamiento de vídeo.
    2. Procesamiento en tiempo real de vídeo (el que se crea artista pierde)
    3. Derritiendo vídeo, audio con calcetines MELT + SOX

Software necesario

(sistemas operativos POSIX, windouseros acercarse con el afán de repensar sus vidas): mplayer, avconv/ffmpeg (libavcodec), melt, sox, imagemagick

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On errors in exams - Short rant

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 11/30/2013 - 13:08

Blogging from a phone... first time ever. I don't want to forget some specifics for this :)

I have just completed an exam to try to enter a postgraduate program (I'll talk more about it once it becomes real ). The exam is administered by CENEVAL, the same evaluation agency Where I presented my graduation equivalency exam some years ago - Only this exam is for all of the postgraduate studies on many national universities and is thus basically just a psychometric test.

The exam had 162 questions, all to be filled in a optical reader sheet, on five subjects: mathematical reasoning, Spanish grammar and comprehension, Project management, Computers and technology, And English reading and understanding.

It was all in all a fun exam to take, mostly due to the math reasoning part. But... on the Subject I Know I am an expert, I have to complain (and intend to find a easy to do so formally). First, I spotted two absolute mistakes (and answered based on What I knew others would, but knowing the answer is wrong technically). One was a subtlety, on how and why have hard drives should be defragmented (and part of my quip is that it's an obsolete habit, but besides, the answers were all erroneous), but a second one was... just wrong. It asked on what should not be part of an "Internet link" (can only guess they meant An URL). The 4 options were valid parts of a URL - including one very seldom used by most people, but very often by many of us: the @ sign.

Anyway, answered it, but my other main gripe is that most of the section was in specific use of Office software. Not only In Office-like, which would be bad enough to begin with, but on specific ways of using Mainly Excel And PowerPoint. Syntax issues, or the name of the menu under which to look for specific functions.
Anyway, I will wait the stipulated 10 days for the exam to be rated, but will anyway look die a way to contact the very opaque and secretive CENEVAL. Not to demand to be better treated, but to try to correct those known mistakes and errors.

Back aches...

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/21/2013 - 11:04

This year, I had slowly taken again running. It's an activity I enjoy, even though I'm far from the condition I had when I did it every day — My maximum was running about 8Km four days a week (ocassionally up to 15Km, say, on weekends)... But I slowly drifted out of it over the last three years. Yes, I have taken it up now and then, but dropped out again after a few weeks.

Well, this year it felt I was getting back in the routine. Not without some gaps, but I had ran most weeks since July at least once, but usually two times. I started slowly, doing about 3Km close to home, but didn't take much to go back to my usual routes inside UNAM, doing a modest average of 4.5-5Km per run, and averaging somewhat over 8Km/h (6.5 min/Km).

But... Well, I cannot relate precisely what happened on this — Exactly a month ago, after a very average run (even a short one, 3.6Km), I had a lower back ache. Didn't pay too much attention to it, but it was strange since the first day, as I often have upper back aches — Never lower.

The pain came and went slowly several times. I kept cycling to work, although not every day. On October 27th, I even took the time to do the Ciclotón, a nice 38Km (including the ~5Km distance from home) around central Mexico City. I enjoyed the ride, even though every stop and re-start of the bike was a bit painful — what hurts is to get off and on the bike: The posture change. But the pain has been almost constantly there. When I stand up, or when I sit down, it's about five minutes until the body gets used to the new position and stops hurting.

Another strange data point: This last weekend (together with a national holiday) we went to a small conference in Guadalajara, and then to visit our friends in Guanajuato. So, we spent 12 hours on the bus there (12‽ Yes, there was an accident on the road, and we could not pass... So many hours were wasted there, and going back to a junction to take an alternative, longer road), then one night in a hotel bed, and two nights in our friends' guest mattresses — which are not precisely luxury-grade. And Sunday night... I had no pain at all!

Came back home, and after only one night back in our bed... I just could not move. I had the strongest pain so far. Could not even walk without some help. We went to the orthopedist a friend recommended, and I was seriously bending my posture: While that part of my posture is usually stable, my right hip was about 2cm higher than the left one, and my shoulders were almost 7cm displaced from my hips!

So... Well, I'm having a cocktail of painkillers and antiinflamatories. The doctor says next week he wants me to have a tomography taken to better understand the causes for this.

And, of course, tomorrow I'm leaving for Festival de Software Libre in Puerto Vallarta. I'm going there by plane, so no big hassle. But the way back, it will be 12 more hours on a bus. I'm... not precisely looking forward to this bus ride :(

Anyway... I sorely miss my bike+running :(

( categories: )

Talking in Paraná: Free Software philosophy / the Debian project. PS: Want to contribute?

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 11/10/2013 - 20:46

I'm very happy: I was finally able to present a talk at a Free Software conference in Paraná, Argentina — Regina's hometown. Not only in Paraná, but at the Vieja Usina culture center, half a block away from her parents' house. So, I must doubly thank Laura: First, for letting us know there would be a Free Software conference there, and second, for taking some pictures :-}

What was this conference? Conferencia Regional de Software Libre, organized by Grupo de Usuarios de GNU/Linux de Entre Ríos (GUGLER). Of course, flying to Argentina (and more specifically, to Paraná, which is ~500Km away from the international airport) just for a one day conference was out of the question — So I gave the talk by videoconference. Of course, given we will be travelling for the December vacations to Argentina, I expect to meet in person the GUGLER guys soon.

I gave a single talk, mixing together two different topics: (my very personal take on) the Free Software philosophy and Debian's place in the Free Software universe. I had a very good time giving the talk, and while I was unable to look at my audience, I got reports saying they were happy and interested. I even got some mails from them, which makes me quite happy ;-)

Now, one of the recurring points whenever I talk about Debian: I often tell people that I cannot tell them why they should use Debian instead of other distributions. My years testing every distribution I come across are long gone, and I nowadays am familiar with Debian only. But I also tell them that personally I gain nothing by having more Debian users in the world — What I want to achieve is the next logical step: To have more people contributing to Debian. So, here is a great opportunity for interested people, specifically a group that often has a hard time finding a way to collaborate with Free Software projects.

Today, Paul Tagliamonte published a call for proposals for Debian 8 (Jessie)'s artwork. So, given many people always want to find a way to contribute to Free Software without being a coder, here's a golden opportunity. You can look at the themes sent for Debian 7 as a reference; look also at the technical requirements for your artwork, and... Well, you have until early February to work on it!

Another guest in the classroom! Sandino Araico ( @KBrown ): Memory management and security

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 11/03/2013 - 12:16

This last Thursday I was able again to lure a good friend of mine into presenting an interesting topic to my students at my Operating Systems class: Sandino Araico, a very well known and very well regarded local security guru, presented several issues regarding memory management. I asked him to present the issues on buffer overflows, as well as possible mitigaion strategies, but of course, to present that topic, he had to walk all over the map of memory management.

A good and interesting class. I was able to film it again, and here it is — Sadly, as I explain to some students who suggested me to put the computer in a different place, the angle and the audio quality are not as good as they could — If I were to move the computer to have a better angle of Sandino, I would lose audio quality.

Being it the eve of Día de Muertos, and having a beutiful mega-altars festival just outside the faculty, the outside noise level was quite high, and... Well, I know Sandino rarely raises his voice, so it was better to locate the computer close to him. Of course, add to it that my hardware is by a long shot far from professional-grade. I just used a very cheapish laptop.

I was a bit skeptical to begin with — I have to recognize I have given this topic quite hastily, as we are getting near the end of semester and there's still a lot of topics to cover. But the students seemed interested in Sandino's presentation, and –once again– I am fully satisfied with my guest's performance.

As always. All of my six guests' presentations (over two semesters) have been great. If I were able to get a guest for each of my classes... I'd even save a lot of class-preparation time! :-}

Oh, but you came here looking for the video, right? Here it is: Memory management and security, by Sandino Araico. October 31, 2013.

César Yáñez (@caesarcomptus) in the classroom: Process scheduling

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 10/13/2013 - 21:34

I try to have some guests every now and then to my Operating Systems class. The class is not as practical/interactive as I'd like, and having some people show the students how the subjects I teach are reflected in the real world is, I feel, very useful for them to understand the topics' importance.

The past semester (the first one for me) I had three guests: Chema Serralde, talking about process scheduling and in particular on the importance of real time, from his perspective as a musician, Rolando Cedillo, talking about the early stages of the boot process, and César Yáñez, giving a review of file systems. This semester, there have been two guests so far: Felipe Esquivel, who spoke about parallelism, and used renders with Blender to illustrate the speed gains and limitations (i.e. Amdahl's law), and this last Thursday, I invited again César Yáñez. César spoke about process scheduling, first giving a quite thorough review of what had taken me at least three sessions to go through, and second, giving some in-depth review based on his experience with Haiku OS.

What else was different this time? I told our coordinator in the faculty, and she invited the other teachers of the subject (and attended herself). So, instead of the usual ~25 students, we have ~40 people in the classroom. And one of them, Adolfo, recorded most of César's explanation. Yay!

Of course, I asked Adolfo for a copy of his recording, and recoded it in a format more suitable for Web viewing. Here it is (almost 300MB, Ogg Video, ~95 minutes). I still have the original video file given to me, in an Apple-generated badly-compressed .mov, but at over 1.5GB, it's too much for a Web download. I will try to record future sessions, as they will surely be useful!

Piracy and culture circulation: #encirc13

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 10/01/2013 - 15:15

This week's lesson on the «Arte y cultura en circulación: crear y compartir en tiempos digitales» course talks about piracy and the circulation of culture, a topic that over time has been debated over and over. And a topic, yes, that can always lead to interesting discussions.

This time, we are requested to choose one among ten ideas among the media groups' discourse on what piracy is and means for the "cultural industry". There are tons of material written already on several of those ten lines (i.e. piracy disincentivates creativity, or two that can be seen as two faces of the same argument, If a consumer can have free access to cultural products, he will stop spending his money on them and Every time a consumer has access to an illegal copy, the industry loses a sale), and some are quite obvious (i.e. Piracy makes job positions be lost... Just look at the amount of people the unauthorized distribution industry feeds! Or possibly, Piracy is a prosper industry that gives money to people distributing illegal products — Of course, that is true. The problem is, what causes said products to be illegal to begin with? Should they be so?). Some other ideas talk about harsher penalties and ways to punish illegal copying in order to drive actors out of that sector (and into the... void?)

So, I chose item #4: Cultural products have a high cost because their production is complex (and a tag could be made, linking complex with expensive). I think this item can lead to a long discussion as to what does this complexity and cost mean.

Some cultural products do require quite a bit of investment, yes. Others don't. How do content producers make the jump to produce expensive works?

If I am a new programmer/artist/writer/screenplayer/whatever, most likely, my products will be not very complex or expensive. I will start small. And if I excel at my work, somebody will look at me and, in some way, become my patron, my sponsor. Being a sponsor might mean that, based on the results of my good work, I could get hired as a software developer at a large company, or an editorial company would buy the patrimonial rights of my book/music (be it for a fixed fee or for a percentage of sales), or whatever. But the leap is not made quantically — A newcomer to the cultural scene will at first, most likely, have a hard time selling his products.

At first, it takes convincing just getting people to take a shot at looking at your work («Hey, please take a look at my program and tell me what you think about it!», «Would you be interested in listening to my latest song?» — And those two are by far ahead of the first attempts where the interactions would more likely be «Turn off that $#^#!^ computer, it's well past bedtime» or «stop murdering that guitar, I'm having a headache»). Maybe the toughest part is to get people to agree to read/hear your work. And there, you start into a continuum — Selling your CDs while performing on the street, then getting to play to a bar, then getting somebody to want to produce (maybe even "discover"!) you. Publish some short stories in your school magazine, then in a "From our audience" section in a larger magazine, then a collective book, your self-published book, yet-unwritten books by contract... The same story over and over again, in each different field.

Ok, yes, but... This logic succession still leaves space for the Important Producers with the Mighty Big Pockets for the most wanted/largest productions, right? And were unauthorized distribution (piracy) to be the norm (as it currently is, dare I say), wouldn't they stop producing an important portion of cultural works?

I'd be tempted to say so. However, a different actor comes into play. When Mighty Big Pockets comes into play, they no longer worry only about getting money from each cultural creation, but from all derived uses of it. And the cultural creation industry (when seen as an industry) goes very much hand in hand with the advertising, marketing industries — They end up blending with each other.

So, the biggest best sellers will most likely have a hit from illegal copiers. Books are still a great business, but hey — An even better business is (usually) movie making. And when you make a movie out of a great story, you will surely link some advertising into it (or at the very least, push advertising/product pushing campaigns to go after it). And there, illegal distribution actually helps the money circle to grow stronger. In the early 1990s, the link between dinosaurs and carbonated drinks was a top seller (because Pepsi™ was a Jurassic Park® sponsor). Although I have always loathed the madness around the World Cups (and basically anything that involves football of any kind), I can perfectly remember several of the theme songs for most of the world cups played during my lifetime.

So, in short... No. Illegal distribution does marginally little harm to the money income to the cultural business, at any level. And where it does get some direct harm, it increases the money flux given the auxiliary channels.

This week it was an easy one: On picking free licensing schemes #encirc13

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 09/22/2013 - 22:07

The third lesson of the «Arte y cultura en circulación: crear y compartir en tiempos digitales» course was quite easy, at least for me, as it's one of the topics I've been involved with for a long time: Authors' rights and ways to exercise them.

This lesson starts by talking about the paradoxes created in the reality beneath copyright mostly due to the zero-cost-for-perfect-copy reality we live in today, and then goes on to introduce the most widely spread licensing schemes for cultural works nowadays: The Creative Commons licensing schemes.

What I felt very interesting is that the lesson tackles the most common issues raised by authors choosing CC licensing: The Non-Commercial and Non-Derivatives restrictions. While authors are usually not very hard to convince about the virtues (and their personal benefit) in CC licensing, it's usually hard for authors to accept and relinquish the "locks" on non-derivability and non-commercial-use.

Now, as to the homework: This time, I have to admit it was a no-brainer to me. The homework was to take part of a "Licenciatón": Publish some work under a open or free license (a work of any kind; it can be text, photo, video, etc.; it can be a new or a pre-existing work) and argue as to why did you choose said license.

Even the act of writing this blog post means I'm releasing some work. The bottom of my blog reads, «All the material found at this site is freely available, and you can use it as you wish, except when the document mentions explicitly different conditions.» Yes, this is not a widely known, preexisting licensing scheme, and more or less goes along the lines of CC0 — There are some good things I have posted in this blog, some things I am proud about. This post goes more towards the average quality: Not adding anything of great value to the world, just reiterating/reposting what is already said. But I know this blog is syndicated over several different places, and its content might be copied over to other places. I don't need to know or be notified about it. I just care for people to be able to reach back if they want to do it.

But, of course, if I'm asked to do a homework, I prefer not to have it so self-referential. What else to license?

We are over halfway across the Wiki Loves Monuments contest for 2013. This year I am clearly not as active on it as I was last year, but yesterday I uploaded about 60 photos from our recent trips, from historical monuments in some towns/cities within ~150Km of Mexico City: Puebla, Tlaxcala, Cacaxtla, Toluca, Santiago Tianguistenco. I intend to upload more. Those photos are licensed CC-BY-SA. Why? Mainly, because it is the defaul for the contest. One of the lessons learned working on Debian is that the less the license I choose deviates from what the upstream authors of a larger project prefer, the more useful my work will be. And being Wikimedia a host of many related projects, I prefer to completely abide by their recommendations unless there is a real, strong reason not to do so.

Also, I know that at least most the photos I am uploading are not of contest quality (although some are quite nice, but we don't take that long to take a shot, and our camera is probably too basic to get a quality shot, if not by mere chance). I am using the WLM contest as an excuse to categorize and upload my pictures — Of course, I'm not including personal photos, but... If I found a building, place or landscape interesting enough to take a photo of, why not make said photo available for whoever needs it, in a canonical, easy to reach media repository (as Wikimedia Commons) is)?

And finally, I think it's time to start getting more open and forward-going with a project that I have been giving a lot of work during the past year, a project that has been even eating quite a bit of my Debian time: My upcoming book. While this book is not yet freely licensed (it is freely distributed online, but does not yet have an explicit license, and I mention it on my teaching/project page. Why? Because it still has some figures and data which are not mine, and which I have to re-elaborate to be able to legally license it.

But anyway — I am writing a book on the subject of Operating Systems, and am basing my teaching on it. The first semester was basically hell for me, as I was working almost full time on it, and needed to allocate some time as well to the rest of my formal work. This second semester has been quite smoother. And there is a very important (to me) initiative to which I (or should I now start saying, we) submitted this work: The LATIn Project: An initiative to collaboratively create quality, freely redistributable text books for the university level, natively in Spanish, for their use in Latin American countries.

I was not able to propose this book due to some formalities — Projects have to be proposed by professors in participant universities, and UNAM is not one of them. However, I offered this work to people in the Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Argentina, and they managed to push the project forward. Together with people from Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes (México) and Universidad del Cauca (Colombia), the project was approved by LATIn.

And this LATIn project can also be seen as a why do you agree to license your work this way? candidate: I have already written most of what I'd be happy to call a full book. Of course, I do expect my colleagues to chime in with more content, and I expect us to produce a true collaborative project. But as I am not part of the member universities, they will get paid for their contribution — And not me. What do I have to gain from this?

More than anything else, the circulation of my work. I'm sure that, were I to publish from UNAM, I would have a good projection. I was (am!) thinking of looking for opportunities to present the book to teachers on the subject, as well as to computing engineering/science students, but the most attractive part (for me) for LATIn is that part of the prize will be that the book will be used to base work on for teaching at least during 2014 in the three said universities — And of course, my/our work will only start then, as we will have to further circulate the work.

Anyway... I expected this post to be small. But as you can see, I am happy with important work perspectives :-)

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