More on hacker conferences and sexual harassment

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 08/16/2012 - 19:41

At the beginning of this year, I blogged about a Mexican security-minded hacker conference scaring away its female audience by advertising in a sexist way.

I don't know if it is the need to be l33t or kewl, to show off that hackers are really socially inept, or what... but this seems to carry on. I know many are familiar with the red/yellow card project (and followup) by kdotcdot.

I am (rightfully? naively?) proud that at DebConf we have achieved a clean conference environment, without such problems... Yes, I know that, during the last ~year at DebConf11 we discussed an anti-harassment policy (look at the thread, it was quite interesting!), came up with standards of respect — And Debian as a whole voted on a GR that ratifies a diversity statement. The fact that we had those very positive discussions, documents and events shows we needed to have them. But, again, this shows that being a hacker does not necessarily mean being a jerk. And I'm very proud to be part of this community.

I recently stumbled across a very nice, insightful post by Valerie Aurora on The Ada Initiative: Supporting women in open technology and cultureDEFCON: Why conference harassment matters. Take a good read at it. I hope it helps shape other hacker groups in a less-aggressive, more welcoming way.

Oh! And before closing: Be sure to at least skim through both Valerie Aurora's and kdotcdot's comments. LOTS of insight in them.

vicm3's picture

And

Even worse, defconf was one, but there where more at the same time several harassment on sci-fi events and also on other fronts one of them including the staff not follow their own written policy about...

Anonymous's picture

Women are very rare, too, at my local LUG.

And feminism is OK IMO, as long as they do not try to promote an anti-male form of sexism.
The problem might be, that hacker-guys and nerds are mostly in love with technological products and with themselves. That makes it difficult for females in such groups.