academic

The students following Kaz's explanation of ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
The students following Kaz's explanation of ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

The students following Kaz's explanation of ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
The students following Kaz's explanation of ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Little piece of the ext4 explanation

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Little piece of the ext4 explanation

After the projector blew up at the beginning of the class, all of the exposition had to be directly in Kaz's laptop screen...

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

Following the source code in his laptop screen, with ~10 eager students following from behind

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Guest class: César Yáñez (@caesarcomptus) talks about virtual memory

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 15:05

Shame on me... I should have uploaded this video a long time ago. I wanted to edit this video to remove pauses, add some in-band indications on who and what it is, and stuff... But after a month, I have not yet got around to do it.

On April 23, I invited César Yáñez to present a talk on virtual memory management to my students (for the Operating Systems class). As always (this is the third time I invite him — The previous iteration was on process scheduling, and is on my site as well), he gave a great class.

I still have some pending videos to upload from the other guests we had this semester, they should come shortly.

Finally: A student once again

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 01/21/2014 - 21:47

Formally, today is my first day as a student on a formal, scholarized institution — Basically for the first time in almost twenty years!

Yes, those that know me know that I aspire to live the life of academia. I have worked at public universities for almost all of my adult life (between 1997 and 1999 I worked at a local ISP and at a private school), and have had a minor academic position («Técnico Académico») for almost ten years. And not having a proper degree limited me from pursuing anything further.

Then, in early 2010 I presented the written exam. By late 2010, the corresponding oral exam. That allowed me to get my formal diploma in December 2010. By the end of 2011, I requested to be a teacher in the Engineering Faculty of UNAM, and started teaching Operating Systems a year ago, in January 2012.

So, a good advance in the last few years... But I know that if I just sit here, I won't be able to advance my position towards really entering the Sacred Halls of Academia. And there are some rituals I have to comply with. One of those rituals is... Devoting some long time to studying under the formal structures.

Ok, so I'm finally a postgraduate student — I have enrolled in Especialidad en Seguridad Informática y Tecnologías de la Información, a short (one year) postgraduate program in ESIME Culhuacán, of Instituto Politécnico Nacional (a small campus of Mexico's second-largest university).

Some friends have asked me, why am I starting with a Specialization and not a Masters degree. Some simple reasons: Just as when I went to Tijuana in 2010 to do my written exam, once I got and started with the paperwork, I didn't want to let it go — If I postpone it, I will probably lose the push to do it by May-July, when the Masters admission process starts. Also, this specialization can be linked with the masters degree on the same topic given at the same campus. This program is one year long, and the masters two — But having them both takes 2.5 years. So, not such a bad deal after all. And finally, because, after such a long time without being scholarized, I fear not having an easy time getting to grips with the discipline. I can commit to overworking myself for a year — If it's too much for me, I'll just stay with that degree and give up. I expect to like it and continue... But it's also a safe bet :-)

Now, there has to be a downside to picking up this path: Of course, my free time will be harshly reduced. I have reduced my Debian involvement in the last year, as I devoted a huge chunk of my time to teaching and book-writing... This year... We shall see what happens. I can for now only confirm what I have said publicly but inside our team only: I have requested to my peers and to our DPL to step down as a DebConf chair. I love organizing DebConf, but I don't want to be formally committed to a position I just cannot fulfill as I did when I started with it. As for package maintenance, by far most of my packges are team maintained, and those that are not are relatively easy to keep track of. And of course, I'll keep an eye on my keyring-maint duties as well — Will even try to link that work with what I do at school!

Anyway, lets see what comes now!

( categories: )

On errors in exams - Short rant

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 11/30/2013 - 13:08

Blogging from a phone... first time ever. I don't want to forget some specifics for this :)

I have just completed an exam to try to enter a postgraduate program (I'll talk more about it once it becomes real ). The exam is administered by CENEVAL, the same evaluation agency Where I presented my graduation equivalency exam some years ago - Only this exam is for all of the postgraduate studies on many national universities and is thus basically just a psychometric test.

The exam had 162 questions, all to be filled in a optical reader sheet, on five subjects: mathematical reasoning, Spanish grammar and comprehension, Project management, Computers and technology, And English reading and understanding.

It was all in all a fun exam to take, mostly due to the math reasoning part. But... on the Subject I Know I am an expert, I have to complain (and intend to find a easy to do so formally). First, I spotted two absolute mistakes (and answered based on What I knew others would, but knowing the answer is wrong technically). One was a subtlety, on how and why have hard drives should be defragmented (and part of my quip is that it's an obsolete habit, but besides, the answers were all erroneous), but a second one was... just wrong. It asked on what should not be part of an "Internet link" (can only guess they meant An URL). The 4 options were valid parts of a URL - including one very seldom used by most people, but very often by many of us: the @ sign.

Anyway, answered it, but my other main gripe is that most of the section was in specific use of Office software. Not only In Office-like, which would be bad enough to begin with, but on specific ways of using Mainly Excel And PowerPoint. Syntax issues, or the name of the menu under which to look for specific functions.
Anyway, I will wait the stipulated 10 days for the exam to be rated, but will anyway look die a way to contact the very opaque and secretive CENEVAL. Not to demand to be better treated, but to try to correct those known mistakes and errors.

Talking in Paraná: Free Software philosophy / the Debian project. PS: Want to contribute?

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 11/10/2013 - 20:46

I'm very happy: I was finally able to present a talk at a Free Software conference in Paraná, Argentina — Regina's hometown. Not only in Paraná, but at the Vieja Usina culture center, half a block away from her parents' house. So, I must doubly thank Laura: First, for letting us know there would be a Free Software conference there, and second, for taking some pictures :-}

What was this conference? Conferencia Regional de Software Libre, organized by Grupo de Usuarios de GNU/Linux de Entre Ríos (GUGLER). Of course, flying to Argentina (and more specifically, to Paraná, which is ~500Km away from the international airport) just for a one day conference was out of the question — So I gave the talk by videoconference. Of course, given we will be travelling for the December vacations to Argentina, I expect to meet in person the GUGLER guys soon.

I gave a single talk, mixing together two different topics: (my very personal take on) the Free Software philosophy and Debian's place in the Free Software universe. I had a very good time giving the talk, and while I was unable to look at my audience, I got reports saying they were happy and interested. I even got some mails from them, which makes me quite happy ;-)

Now, one of the recurring points whenever I talk about Debian: I often tell people that I cannot tell them why they should use Debian instead of other distributions. My years testing every distribution I come across are long gone, and I nowadays am familiar with Debian only. But I also tell them that personally I gain nothing by having more Debian users in the world — What I want to achieve is the next logical step: To have more people contributing to Debian. So, here is a great opportunity for interested people, specifically a group that often has a hard time finding a way to collaborate with Free Software projects.

Today, Paul Tagliamonte published a call for proposals for Debian 8 (Jessie)'s artwork. So, given many people always want to find a way to contribute to Free Software without being a coder, here's a golden opportunity. You can look at the themes sent for Debian 7 as a reference; look also at the technical requirements for your artwork, and... Well, you have until early February to work on it!

Talking at CRSL (GUGLER), Vieja Usina, Paraná

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 11/10/2013 - 20:19
Talking at CRSL (GUGLER), Vieja Usina, Paraná

Presenting my talk via videoconference at Conferencia Regional de Software Libre, set up by GUGLER, in Paraná, Argentina, November 7, 2013

Questions from the audience at CRSL (GUGLER), Vieja Usina, Paraná

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 11/10/2013 - 20:17
Questions from the audience at CRSL (GUGLER), Vieja Usina, Paraná

The audience during my (network-provided) talk in Paraná, Argentina; November 7 2013

Another guest in the classroom! Sandino Araico ( @KBrown ): Memory management and security

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 11/03/2013 - 12:16

This last Thursday I was able again to lure a good friend of mine into presenting an interesting topic to my students at my Operating Systems class: Sandino Araico, a very well known and very well regarded local security guru, presented several issues regarding memory management. I asked him to present the issues on buffer overflows, as well as possible mitigaion strategies, but of course, to present that topic, he had to walk all over the map of memory management.

A good and interesting class. I was able to film it again, and here it is — Sadly, as I explain to some students who suggested me to put the computer in a different place, the angle and the audio quality are not as good as they could — If I were to move the computer to have a better angle of Sandino, I would lose audio quality.

Being it the eve of Día de Muertos, and having a beutiful mega-altars festival just outside the faculty, the outside noise level was quite high, and... Well, I know Sandino rarely raises his voice, so it was better to locate the computer close to him. Of course, add to it that my hardware is by a long shot far from professional-grade. I just used a very cheapish laptop.

I was a bit skeptical to begin with — I have to recognize I have given this topic quite hastily, as we are getting near the end of semester and there's still a lot of topics to cover. But the students seemed interested in Sandino's presentation, and –once again– I am fully satisfied with my guest's performance.

As always. All of my six guests' presentations (over two semesters) have been great. If I were able to get a guest for each of my classes... I'd even save a lot of class-preparation time! :-}

Oh, but you came here looking for the video, right? Here it is: Memory management and security, by Sandino Araico. October 31, 2013.

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