Life

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Relax and breathe...

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 06/21/2016 - 14:30

Time passes. I had left several (too many?) pending things to be done un the quiet weeks between the end of the lective semestre and the beginning of muy Summer trip to Winter. But Saturday gets closer every moment... And our long trip to the South begins.

Among many other things, I wanted to avance with some Debían stuff - both packaging and WRT keyring analysis. I want to contacto some people I left pending interactions with, but honestly, that will only come face to face un Capetown.

As to "real life", I hace too many pending issues at work to even begin with; I hope to get some time at South África todo do some decent UNAM sysadmining. Also, I want to play the idea of using Git for my students' workflow (handing in projects and assignments, at least)... This can be interesting to talk with the Debían colleagues about, actually.

As a Masters student, I'm making good advances, and will probably finish muy class work next semester, six months ahead of schedule, but muy thesis work so far has progressed way slower than what I'd like. I have at least a better defined topic and approach, so I'll start the writing phase soon.

And the personal life? Family? I am more complete and happy than ever before. My life su completely different from two years ago. Yes, that was obvious. But it's also the only thing I can come up with. Having twin babies (when will they make the transition from "babies" to "kids"? No idea... We will find out as it comes) is more than beautiful, more than great. Our life has changed in every possible aspect. And yes, I admire my loved Regina for all of the energy and love she puts on the babies... Life is asymetric, I am out for most of the day... Mommy is always there.

As I said, happier than ever before.

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Passover / Pesaj, a secular viewpoint, a different viewpoint... And slowly becoming history!

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 04/25/2016 - 11:51

As many of you know (where "you" is "people reading this who actually know who I am), I come from a secular Jewish family. Although we have some religious (even very religious) relatives, neither my parents nor my grandparents were religious ever. Not that spirituality wasn't important to them — My grandparents both went deep into understanding by and for themselves the different spiritual issues that came to their mind, and that's one of the traits I most remember about them while I was growing up. But formal, organized religion was never much welcome in the family; again, each of us had their own ways to concile our needs and fears with what we thought, read and understood.

This week is the Jewish celebration of Passover, or Pesaj as we call it (for which Passover is a direct translation, as Pesaj refers to the act of the angel of death passing over the houses of the sons of Israel during the tenth plague in Egypt; in Spanish, the name would be Pascua, which rather refers to the ritual sacrifice of a lamb that was done in the days of the great temple)... Anyway, I like giving context to what I write, but it always takes me off the main topic I want to share. Back to my family.

I am a third-generation member of the Hashomer Hatzair zionist socialist youth movement; my grandmother was among the early Hashomer Hatzair members in Poland in the 1920s, both my parents were active in the Mexico ken in the 1950s-1960s (in fact, they met and first interacted there), and I was a member from 1984 until 1996. It was also thanks to Hashomer that my wife and I met, and if my children get to have any kind of Jewish contact in their lifes, I hope it will be through Hashomer as well.

Hashomer is a secular, nationalist movement. A youth movement with over a century of history might seem like a contradiction. Over the years, of course, it has changed many details, but as far as I know, the essence is still there, and I hope it will continue to be so for good: Helping shape integral people, with identification with Judaism as a nation and not as a religion; keeping our cultural traits, but interpreting them liberally, and aligned with a view towards the common good — Socialism, no matter how the concept seems passé nowadays. Colectivism. Inclusion. Peaceful coexistence with our neighbours. Acceptance of the different. I could write pages on how I learnt about each of them during my years in Hashomer, how such concepts striked me as completely different as what the broader Jewish community I grew up in understood and related to them... But again, I am steering off the topic I want to pursue.

Every year, we used to have a third Seder (that is, a third Passover ceremony) at Hashomer. A third one, because as tradition mandates two ceremonies to be held outside Israel, and a movement comprised of people aged between 7 and 21, having a seder competing with the familiar one would not be too successful, we held a celebration on a following day. But it would never be the same as the "formal" Pesaj: For the Seder, the Jewish tradition mandates following the Hagada — The Seder always follows a predetermined order (literally, Seder means order), and the Hagadá (which means both legend and a story that is spoken; you can find full Hagadot online if you want to see what rites are followed; I found a seemingly well done, modern, Hebrew and English version, a more traditional one, in Hebrew and Spanish, and Wikipedia has a description including its parts and rites) is, quite understandably, full with religious words, praises for God, and... Well, many things that are not in line with Hashomer's values. How could we be a secular movement and have a big celebration full with praises for God? How could we yearn for life in the kibbutz distance from the true agricultural meaning of the celebration?

The members of Hashomer Hatzair repeatedly took on the task (or, as many would see it, the heresy) of adapting the Hagada to follow their worldview, updated it for the twentieth century, had it more palatable for our peculiarities. Yesterday, when we had our Seder, I saw my father still has –together with the other, more traditional Hagadot we use– two copies of the Hagadá he used at Hashomer Hatzair's third Seder. And they are not only beautiful works showing what they, as very young activists thought and made solemn, but over time, they are becoming historic items by themselves (one when my parents were still young janijim, in 1956, and one when they were starting to have responsabilities and were non-formal teachers or path-showers, madrijim, in 1959). He also had a copy of the Hagadá we used in the 1980s when I was at Hashomer; this last one was (sadly?) not done by us as members of Hashomer, but prepared by a larger group between Hashomer Hatzair and the Mexican friends of Israeli's associated left wing party, Mapam. This last one, I don't know which year it was prepared and published on, but I remember following it in our ceremony.

So, I asked him to borrow me the three little books, almost leaflets, and scanned them to be put online. Of course, there is no formal licensing information in them, much less explicit authorship information, but they are meant to be shared — So I took the liberty of uploading them to the Internet Archive, tagging them as CC-0 licensed. And if you are interested in them, flowing over and back between Spanish and Hebrew, with many beautiful texts adapted for them from various sources, illustrated by our own with the usual heroic, socialist-inspired style, and lovingly hand-reproduced using the adequate technology for their day... Here they are:

I really enjoyed the time I took scanning and forming them, reading some passages, imagining ourselves and my parents as youngsters, remembering the beautiful work we did at such a great organization. I hope this brings this joy to others like it did to me.

פעם שומר, תמיד שומר. Once shomer, always shomer.

Yes! I can confirm that...

Submitted by gwolf on Fri, 03/25/2016 - 22:25

I am very very (very very very!) happy to confirm that...

This year, and after many years of not being able to, I will cross the Atlantic. To do this, I will take my favorite excuse: Attending DebConf!

So, yes, this image I am pasting here is as far as you can imagine from official promotional material. But, having bought my plane tickets, I have to start bragging about it ;-)

In case it is of use to others (at least, to people from my general geographic roundabouts), I searched for plane tickets straight from Mexico. I was accepting my lack of luck, facing an over-36-hour trip(!!) and at very high prices. Most routes were Mexico-{central_europe}-Arab Emirates-South Africa... Great for collecting frequent-flier miles, but terrible for anything else. Of course, requesting a more logical route (say, via Sao Paulo in Brazil) resulted in a price hike to over US$3500. Not good.

I found out that Mexico-Argentina tickets for that season were quite agreeable at US$800, so I booked our family vacation to visit the relatives, and will fly from there at US$1400. So, yes, in a 48-hr timespan I will do MEX-GRU-ROS, then (by land) Rosario to Buenos Aires, then AEP-GRU-JNB-CPT. But while I am at DebConf, Regina and the kids will be at home with the grandparents and family and friends. In the end, win-win with just an extra bit of jetlag for me ;-)

I *really* expect flights to be saner for USians, Europeans, and those coming from further far away. But we have grown to have many Latin Americans, and I hope we can all meet in CPT for the most intense weeks of the year!

See you all in South Africa!

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Busy with the worthy things...

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 03/19/2016 - 23:53

My online activity, in most if not all of the projects I most care about, has dropped to a lifelong minimum. But that is not necessarily a bad thing — Yes, I want to be more involved again in everything. And yes, I am in a permanent crisis of lack of time (and/or sleep).

I didn't even remember to blog about this on time... but never mind...

A little over a year after the single, most important moment I have lived, we are not only enjoying, but deeply understanding the true meaning of life.

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Elena and Mom

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 03/19/2016 - 23:46
Elena and Mom

Tongues out!

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Alan and Dad

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 03/19/2016 - 23:45
Alan and Dad
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Basket of toys

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 03/19/2016 - 23:45
Basket of toys
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On evolving communities and changing social practices

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 10/08/2015 - 18:25

I will join Lars and Tincho in stating this, and presenting a version contrary to what Norbert portraits.

I am very glad and very proud that the community I am most involved in, the Debian project, has kept its core identity over the years, at least for the slightly-over-a-decade I have been involved in it. And I am very glad and very proud that being less aggressive, more welcoming and in general more respectful to each other does not counter this.

When I joined Debian, part of the mantra chants we had is that in order to join a Free Software project you had to grow a thick skin, as sooner or later we'd all be exposed to flamefests. But, yes, the median age of the DD was way lower back then — I don't have the data at hand, but IIRC I have always been close to our median. Which means we are all growing old and grumpy. But old and wiser.

A very successful, important and dear subproject to many of us is the Debian Women Project. Its original aim was, as the name shows, to try to reduce the imbalance between men and women participants in Debian — IIRC back in 2004 we had 3 female DDs, and >950 male DDs. Soon, the project started morphing into pushing all of Debian to be less hostile, more open to contributions from any- and everyone (as today our diversity statement reads).

And yes, we are still a long, long, long way from reaching equality. But we have done great steps. And not just WRT women, but all of the different minorities, as well as to diverging opinions within our community. Many people don't enjoy us abiding by a code of conduct; I also find it irritating sometimes to have to abide by certain codes if we mostly know each other and know we won't be offended by a given comment... Or will we?

So, being more open and more welcoming also means being more civil. I cannot get myself to agree with Linus' quote, when he says that respect is not just given to everybody but must be earned. We should always start, and I enjoy feeling that in Debian this is becoming the norm, by granting respect to everybody — And not losing it, even if things get out of hand. Thick skins are not good for communication.

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180

Submitted by gwolf on Fri, 08/28/2015 - 11:09

180 degrees — people say their life has changed by 180° whenever something alters their priorities, their viewpoints, their targets in life.

In our case, it's been 180 days. 183 by today, really. The six most amazing months in my life.

We are still the same people, with similar viewpoints and targets. Our priorities have clearly shifted.

But our understanding of the world, and our sources of enjoyment, and our outlook for the future... Are worlds apart. Not 180°, think more of a quantic transposition.

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Feeling somewhat special

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 05/19/2015 - 18:36

Today I feel more special than I have ever felt.

Or... Well, or something like that.

Thing is, there is no clear adjective for this — But I successfully finished my Specialization degree! Yes, believe it or not, today I can formally say I am Specialist in Informatic Security and Information Technologies (Especialista en Seguridad Informática y Tecnologías de la Información), as awarded by the Higher School of Electric and Mechanic Engineering (Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica) of the National Polytechnical Institute (Instituto Politécnico Nacional).

In Mexico and most Latin American countries, degrees are usually incorporated to your name as if they were a nobiliary title. Thus, when graduating from Engineering studies (pre-graduate universitary level), I became "Ingeniero Gunnar Wolf". People graduating from further postgraduate programs get to introduce themselves as "Maestro Foobar Baz" or "Doctor Quux Noox". And yes, a Specialization is a small posgraduate program (I often say, the smallest possible posgraduate). And as a Specialist... What can I brag about? Can say I am Specially Gunnar Wolf? Or Special Gunnar Wolf? Nope. The honorific title for a Specialization is a pointer to null, and when casted into a char* it might corrupt your honor-recognizing function. So I'm still Ingeniero Gunnar Wolf, for information security reasons.

So that's the reason I am now enrolled in the Masters program. I hope to write an addenda to this message soonish (where soonish ≥ 18 months) saying I'm finally a Maestro.

As a sidenote, many people asked me: Why did I take on the specialization, which is a degree too small for most kinds of real work recognition? Because it's been around twenty years since I last attended a long-term scholar program as a student. And my dish is quite full with activities and responsabilities. I decided to take a short program, designed for 12 months (I graduated in 16, minus two months that the university was on strike... Quite good, I'd say ;-) ) to see how I fared on it, and only later jumping on the full version.

Because, yes, to advance my career at the university, I finally recognized and understood that I do need postgraduate studies.

Oh, and what kind of work did I do for this? Besides the classes I took, I wrote a thesis on a model for evaluating covert channels for establishing secure communications.

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Everybody seems to have an opinion on the taxis vs. Uber debate...

Submitted by gwolf on Wed, 05/13/2015 - 23:46

The discussion regarding the legality and convenience of Uber, Cabify and similar taxi-by-app services has come to Mexico City — Over the last few days, I've seen newspapers talk about taxi drivers demonstrating against said companies, early attempts at regulating their service, and so on.

I hold the view that every member of a society should live by its accepted rules (i.e. laws) — and if they hold the laws as incorrect, unfair or wrong, they should strive to get the laws to change. Yes, it's a hard thing to do, most often filled with resistence, but it's the only socially responsible way to go.

Private driver hiring applications have several flaws, but maybe the biggest one is that they are... How to put it? I cannot find a word better than illegal. Taxi drivers in our city (and in most cities, as far as I have read) undergo a long process to ensure they are fit for the task. Is the process incomplete? Absolutely. But the answer is not to abolish it in the name of the free market. The process must be, if anything, tightened. The process for granting a public driver license to an individual is way stricter than to issue me a driving license (believe it or not, Mexico City abolished taking driving tests several years ago). Taxis do get physical and mechanical review — Is their status mint and perfect? No way. But compare them to taxis in other Mexican states, and you will see they are in general in a much better shape.

Now... One of the things that angered me most about the comments to articles such as the ones I'm quoting is the middle class mentality they are written from. I have seen comments ranging from stupidly racist humor attempts (Mr. Mayor, the Guild of Kidnappers and Robbers of Iztapalapa demand the IMMEDIATE prohibition on UBER as we are running low on clients or the often repeated comment that taxi drivers are (...) dirty, armpit-smelly that listen to whatever music they want) to economic culture-based discrimination Uber is just for credit card users as if it were enough of an argument... Much to the opposite, it's just discrimination, as many people in this city are not credit subjects and do not exist in the banking system, or cannot have an always-connected smartphone — Should they be excluded from the benefits of modernity just because of their economic difference?

And yes, I'm by far not saying Mexico City's taxi drivers are optimal. I am an urban cyclist, and my biggest concern/fear are usually taxi drivers (more so than microbus drivers, which are a class of their own). Again , as I said at the beginning of the post, I am of the idea that if current laws and their enforcement are not enough for a society, it has to change due to that society's pressure — It cannot just be ignored because nobody follows the rules anyway. There is quite a bit that can be learnt from Uber's ways, and there are steps that can be taken by the company to become formal and legal, in our country and in others where they are accused of the same lacking issues.

We all deserve better services. Not just those of us that can pay for a smartphone and are entitled to credit cards. And all passenger-bearing services require strict regulations.

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Bestest birthday ever

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 04/27/2015 - 22:24
Bestest birthday ever

That's all I need to enjoy the best best party ever.

Oh! Shall I mention that we got a beautiful present for the kids from our very dear DebConf official Laminatrix! Photos not yet available, but will provide soon.

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Worthy weekend

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 04/26/2015 - 23:34

(No, I'm not talking about a future Ubuntu release... After all, what kind of weird animal would a weekend be?)

This weekend we took the kids outside for the first time (not counting, of course, visits to the pediatrician). We were quite anxious... Of course, they were born somewhat under weight and at 7½ months of gestation. But this Saturday we feelt adventurous, and took the kids out for a day among people!

It might not sound like a big deal, but... Well, we took a not such beautiful or scenic route: We took them to the supermarket, and had a small lunch out. For the first time in the already two months they have been with us.

Dinner with friends at home, having a very good time, and –as expected– a... Very hard night for us. All that excitement had the babies very nervous.

Today –again, for the first time– we took the children out to visit some friends of ours. Again, it was great, they behaved very nicely, and were lovely all around.

Lets see what this night holds in place for us.

Anyway, with them growing slowly but steadily... We are very happy, thankful parents. For the first time since Regina is with me in Mexico, this time we decided we would not have a birthday party (yes, I'm 30 minutes away from being 39 year old). I cannot imagine a fuller, better celebration than what we are having. This two babies are the real event in our lives.

Oh... And by the way, this weekend also saw the release of a great new Debian release: Debian 8, codenamed Jessie. Thanks, folks, for such a great birthday present ;-) For reasons that should by now be obvious, I wasn't able to go to either of the release parties I knew of in Mexico City (even one of them was ~500m from home!)

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More on Debian as a social, quasi-familiar project

Submitted by gwolf on Wed, 12/24/2014 - 11:49

I have long wanted to echo Gregor's beautiful Debian Advent Calendar posts. Gregor is a dear project member and a dear friend to many of us Debianers, who has shown an amount of stamina and care for the project that inspires everybody; this year, after many harsh flamefests in the project (despite which we are moving at a great rate towards a great release!), many people have felt the need to echo how Debian –even as often seen from the outside as a hostile mass of blabbering geeks– is actually a great place to work together and to create a deep, strong social fabric — And that's quite probably what binds the project together and ensures it will continue existing and excelling for a long time.

As for the personal part: This year, my Debian involvement has –once again– reduced. Not because I care less about Debian, much to the contrary, but because I have taken several responsabilities which require my attention and time. Technically, I'm basically maintaining a couple of PHP-based packages I use for work (most prominently, Drupal7). I have stepped back of most of my DebConf responsabilities, although I stay (and will stay, as it's an area of the project I deeply enjoy doing) involved. And, of course, my current main area of involvement is keyring-maint (for which I have posted here several status updates).

I have to say that we expected having a much harder time (read: Stronger opposition and discussions) regarding the expiry of 1024D keys. Of course, many people do have a hard time connecting anew to the web of trust, and we will still face quite a bit of work after January 1st, but the migration has been a mostly pleasant (although clearly intensive) work. Jonathan has just told me we are down to only 306 1024D keys in the keyring (which almost exactly matches the "200-300" I expected back at DC14).

Anyway: People predicting doomsday scenarios for Debian do it because they are not familiar with how deep the project runs in us, how important it is socially, almost at a family level, to us that have been long involved in it. Debian is stronger than a technical or political discussion, no matter how harsh it is.

And, as a personal thank-you: Gregor, your actions (the GDAC, the RC bug reports) inspire us to stay active, to do our volunteer work better, and remind us of how great is it to be a part of a global, distributed will to Do It Right. Thanks a lot!

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Stone wall

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 12/09/2014 - 13:05
Stone wall

Cuetlajuchitlán archaeologic zone, Guerrero

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