Life

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#DebConf17, Montreal • An evening out

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 08/07/2017 - 06:49

I have been in Montreal only for a day. Yesterday night, I left DebConf just after I finished presenting the Continuous Key-Signing Party introduction to go out with a long-time friend from Mexico and his family. We went to the Mont Royal park, from where you can have a beautiful city view:

What I was most amazed of as a Mexico City dweller is of the sky, of the air... Not just in this picture, but as we arrived, or later when a full moon rose. This city has beautiful air, and a very beautiful view. We later went for dinner to a place I heartfully recommend to other non-vegetarian attendees:

Portuguese-style grill. Delicious. Of course, were I to go past it, I'd just drive on (as it had a very long queue waiting to enter). The secret: Do your request on the phone. Make a short queue to pick it up. Have somebody in the group wait for a table, or eat at the nearby Parc Lafontaine. And... Thoroughly enjoy :-)

Anyway, I'm leaving for the venue, about to use the Bixi service for the first time. See you guys soon! (if you are at DebConf17, of course. And you should all be here!)

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Getting ready for DebConf17 in Montreal!

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 07/24/2017 - 22:56


(image shamelessly copied from Noodles' Emptiness)

This year I will only make it to DebConf, not to DebCamp. But, still, I am very very happy and excited as the travel date looms nearer! I have ordered some of the delicacies for the Cheese and Wine party, signed up for the public bicycle system of Montreal, and done a fair share of work with the Content Team; finally today we sent out the announcement for the schedule of talks. Of course, there are several issues yet to fix, and a lot of things to do before traveling... But, no doubt about this: It will be an intense week!

Oh, one more thing while we are at it: The schedule as it was published today does not really look like we have organized stuff into tracks — But we have! This will be soon fixed, adding some color-coding to make tracks clearer on the schedule.

This year, I pushed for the Content Team to recover the notion of tracks as an organizative measure, and as something that delivers value to DebConf as a whole. Several months ago, I created a Wiki page for the DebConf tracks, asking interested people to sign up for them. We currently have the following tracks registered:

Blends
Andreas Tille
Debian Science
Michael Banck
Cloud and containers
Luca Filipozzi
Embedded
Pending
Systems administration, automation and orchestation
Pending
Security
Gunnar Wolf

We have two tracks still needing a track coordinator. Do note that most of the tasks mentioned by the Wiki have already been carried out; what a track coordinator will now do is to serve as some sort of moderator, maybe a recurring talkmeister, ensuring continuity and probably providing for some commentary, giving some unity to its sessions. So, the responsibilities for a track coordinator right now are quite similar to what is expected for video team volunteers — but to a set of contiguous sessions.

If you are interested in being the track coordinator/moderator for Embedded or for Systems administration, automation and orchestation or even to share the job with any of the other, registered, coordinators, please speak up! Mail content@debconf.org and update the table in the Wiki page.

See you very soon in Montreal!

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Started getting ads for ransomware. Coincidence?

Submitted by gwolf on Fri, 02/24/2017 - 14:06

Very strange. Verrrry strange.

Yesterday I wrote a blog post on spam stuff that has been hitting my mailbox. Nothing too deep, just me scratching my head.

Coincidentally (I guess/hope), I have been getting messages via my Bitlbee to one of my Jabber accounts, offering me ransomware services. I am reproducing it here, omitting of course everything I can recognize as their brand names related URLs (as I'm not going to promote the 3vi1-doers). I'm reproducing this whole as I'm sure the information will be interesting for some.

*BRAND* Ransomware - The Most Advanced and Customisable you've Ever Seen
Conquer your Independence with *BRAND* Ransomware Full Lifetime License!
* UNIQUE FEATURES
* NO DEPENDENCIES (.net or whatever)!!!
* Edit file Icon and UAC - Works on All Windows Versions
* Set Folders and Extensions to Encrypt, Deadline and Russian Roulette
* Edit the Text, speak with voice (multilang) and Colors for Ransom Window
* Enable/disable USB infect, network spread & file melt
* Set Process Name, sleep time, update ransom amount, Give mercy button
* Full-featured headquarter (for Windows) with unlimited builds, PDF reports, charts and maps, totally autonomous operation
* PHP Bridges instead of expensive C&C servers!
* Automatic Bitcoin payment detection (impossible to bypass/crack - we challege who says the contrary to prove what they say!)
* Totally/Mathematically IMPOSSIBLE to DECRYPT! Period.
* Award-Winning Five-Stars support and constant updates!
* We Have lot vouchs in *BRAND* Market, can check!
Watch the promo video: *URL*
Screenshots: *URL*
Website: *URL*
Price: $389
Promo: just $309 - 20% OFF! until 25th Feb 2017
Jabber: *JID*

I think I can comment on this with my students. Hopefully, this is interesting to others.
Now... I had never received Jabber-spam before. This message has been sent to me 14 times in the last 24 hours (all from different JIDs, all unknown to me). I hope this does not last forever :-/ Otherwise, I will have to learn more on how to configure Bitlbee to ignore contacts not known to me. Grrr...

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Book presentation by @arenitasoria: Hacker ethics, security and surveillance

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/17/2016 - 14:24

At the beginning of this year, Irene Soria invited me to start a series of talks on the topic of hacker ethics, security and surveillance. I presented a talk titled Cryptography and identity: Not everything is anonymity.

The talk itself is recorded and available in archive.org (sidenote: I find it amazing that Universidad del Claustro de Sor Juana uses archive.org as their main multimedia publishing platform!)

But as part of this excercise, Irene invited me to write a chapter for a book covering the series. And, yes, she delivered!

So, finally, we will have the book presentation:

I know, not everybody following my posts (that means... Only those at or near Mexico City) will be able to join. But the good news: The book, as soon as it is presented, will be published under a CC BY-SA license. Of course, I will notify when it is ready.

Talking about the Debian keyring in Investigaciones Nucleares, UNAM

Submitted by gwolf on Wed, 08/17/2016 - 13:47

For the readers of my blog that happen to be in Mexico City, I was invited to give a talk at Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Ciudad Universitaria, UNAM.

I will be at Auditorio Marcos Moshinsky, on August 26 starting at 13:00. Auditorio Marcos Moshinsky is where we met for the early (~1996-1997) Mexico Linux User Group meetings. And... Wow. I'm amazed to realize it's been twenty years that I arrived there, young and innocent, the newest of what looked like a sect obsessed with world domination and a penguin fetish.

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Relax and breathe...

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 06/21/2016 - 14:30

Time passes. I had left several (too many?) pending things to be done un the quiet weeks between the end of the lective semestre and the beginning of muy Summer trip to Winter. But Saturday gets closer every moment... And our long trip to the South begins.

Among many other things, I wanted to avance with some Debían stuff - both packaging and WRT keyring analysis. I want to contacto some people I left pending interactions with, but honestly, that will only come face to face un Capetown.

As to "real life", I hace too many pending issues at work to even begin with; I hope to get some time at South África todo do some decent UNAM sysadmining. Also, I want to play the idea of using Git for my students' workflow (handing in projects and assignments, at least)... This can be interesting to talk with the Debían colleagues about, actually.

As a Masters student, I'm making good advances, and will probably finish muy class work next semester, six months ahead of schedule, but muy thesis work so far has progressed way slower than what I'd like. I have at least a better defined topic and approach, so I'll start the writing phase soon.

And the personal life? Family? I am more complete and happy than ever before. My life su completely different from two years ago. Yes, that was obvious. But it's also the only thing I can come up with. Having twin babies (when will they make the transition from "babies" to "kids"? No idea... We will find out as it comes) is more than beautiful, more than great. Our life has changed in every possible aspect. And yes, I admire my loved Regina for all of the energy and love she puts on the babies... Life is asymetric, I am out for most of the day... Mommy is always there.

As I said, happier than ever before.

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Passover / Pesaj, a secular viewpoint, a different viewpoint... And slowly becoming history!

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 04/25/2016 - 11:51

As many of you know (where "you" is "people reading this who actually know who I am), I come from a secular Jewish family. Although we have some religious (even very religious) relatives, neither my parents nor my grandparents were religious ever. Not that spirituality wasn't important to them — My grandparents both went deep into understanding by and for themselves the different spiritual issues that came to their mind, and that's one of the traits I most remember about them while I was growing up. But formal, organized religion was never much welcome in the family; again, each of us had their own ways to concile our needs and fears with what we thought, read and understood.

This week is the Jewish celebration of Passover, or Pesaj as we call it (for which Passover is a direct translation, as Pesaj refers to the act of the angel of death passing over the houses of the sons of Israel during the tenth plague in Egypt; in Spanish, the name would be Pascua, which rather refers to the ritual sacrifice of a lamb that was done in the days of the great temple)... Anyway, I like giving context to what I write, but it always takes me off the main topic I want to share. Back to my family.

I am a third-generation member of the Hashomer Hatzair zionist socialist youth movement; my grandmother was among the early Hashomer Hatzair members in Poland in the 1920s, both my parents were active in the Mexico ken in the 1950s-1960s (in fact, they met and first interacted there), and I was a member from 1984 until 1996. It was also thanks to Hashomer that my wife and I met, and if my children get to have any kind of Jewish contact in their lifes, I hope it will be through Hashomer as well.

Hashomer is a secular, nationalist movement. A youth movement with over a century of history might seem like a contradiction. Over the years, of course, it has changed many details, but as far as I know, the essence is still there, and I hope it will continue to be so for good: Helping shape integral people, with identification with Judaism as a nation and not as a religion; keeping our cultural traits, but interpreting them liberally, and aligned with a view towards the common good — Socialism, no matter how the concept seems passé nowadays. Colectivism. Inclusion. Peaceful coexistence with our neighbours. Acceptance of the different. I could write pages on how I learnt about each of them during my years in Hashomer, how such concepts striked me as completely different as what the broader Jewish community I grew up in understood and related to them... But again, I am steering off the topic I want to pursue.

Every year, we used to have a third Seder (that is, a third Passover ceremony) at Hashomer. A third one, because as tradition mandates two ceremonies to be held outside Israel, and a movement comprised of people aged between 7 and 21, having a seder competing with the familiar one would not be too successful, we held a celebration on a following day. But it would never be the same as the "formal" Pesaj: For the Seder, the Jewish tradition mandates following the Hagada — The Seder always follows a predetermined order (literally, Seder means order), and the Hagadá (which means both legend and a story that is spoken; you can find full Hagadot online if you want to see what rites are followed; I found a seemingly well done, modern, Hebrew and English version, a more traditional one, in Hebrew and Spanish, and Wikipedia has a description including its parts and rites) is, quite understandably, full with religious words, praises for God, and... Well, many things that are not in line with Hashomer's values. How could we be a secular movement and have a big celebration full with praises for God? How could we yearn for life in the kibbutz distance from the true agricultural meaning of the celebration?

The members of Hashomer Hatzair repeatedly took on the task (or, as many would see it, the heresy) of adapting the Hagada to follow their worldview, updated it for the twentieth century, had it more palatable for our peculiarities. Yesterday, when we had our Seder, I saw my father still has –together with the other, more traditional Hagadot we use– two copies of the Hagadá he used at Hashomer Hatzair's third Seder. And they are not only beautiful works showing what they, as very young activists thought and made solemn, but over time, they are becoming historic items by themselves (one when my parents were still young janijim, in 1956, and one when they were starting to have responsabilities and were non-formal teachers or path-showers, madrijim, in 1959). He also had a copy of the Hagadá we used in the 1980s when I was at Hashomer; this last one was (sadly?) not done by us as members of Hashomer, but prepared by a larger group between Hashomer Hatzair and the Mexican friends of Israeli's associated left wing party, Mapam. This last one, I don't know which year it was prepared and published on, but I remember following it in our ceremony.

So, I asked him to borrow me the three little books, almost leaflets, and scanned them to be put online. Of course, there is no formal licensing information in them, much less explicit authorship information, but they are meant to be shared — So I took the liberty of uploading them to the Internet Archive, tagging them as CC-0 licensed. And if you are interested in them, flowing over and back between Spanish and Hebrew, with many beautiful texts adapted for them from various sources, illustrated by our own with the usual heroic, socialist-inspired style, and lovingly hand-reproduced using the adequate technology for their day... Here they are:

I really enjoyed the time I took scanning and forming them, reading some passages, imagining ourselves and my parents as youngsters, remembering the beautiful work we did at such a great organization. I hope this brings this joy to others like it did to me.

פעם שומר, תמיד שומר. Once shomer, always shomer.

Yes! I can confirm that...

Submitted by gwolf on Fri, 03/25/2016 - 22:25

I am very very (very very very!) happy to confirm that...

This year, and after many years of not being able to, I will cross the Atlantic. To do this, I will take my favorite excuse: Attending DebConf!

So, yes, this image I am pasting here is as far as you can imagine from official promotional material. But, having bought my plane tickets, I have to start bragging about it ;-)

In case it is of use to others (at least, to people from my general geographic roundabouts), I searched for plane tickets straight from Mexico. I was accepting my lack of luck, facing an over-36-hour trip(!!) and at very high prices. Most routes were Mexico-{central_europe}-Arab Emirates-South Africa... Great for collecting frequent-flier miles, but terrible for anything else. Of course, requesting a more logical route (say, via Sao Paulo in Brazil) resulted in a price hike to over US$3500. Not good.

I found out that Mexico-Argentina tickets for that season were quite agreeable at US$800, so I booked our family vacation to visit the relatives, and will fly from there at US$1400. So, yes, in a 48-hr timespan I will do MEX-GRU-ROS, then (by land) Rosario to Buenos Aires, then AEP-GRU-JNB-CPT. But while I am at DebConf, Regina and the kids will be at home with the grandparents and family and friends. In the end, win-win with just an extra bit of jetlag for me ;-)

I *really* expect flights to be saner for USians, Europeans, and those coming from further far away. But we have grown to have many Latin Americans, and I hope we can all meet in CPT for the most intense weeks of the year!

See you all in South Africa!

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Busy with the worthy things...

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 03/19/2016 - 23:53

My online activity, in most if not all of the projects I most care about, has dropped to a lifelong minimum. But that is not necessarily a bad thing — Yes, I want to be more involved again in everything. And yes, I am in a permanent crisis of lack of time (and/or sleep).

I didn't even remember to blog about this on time... but never mind...

A little over a year after the single, most important moment I have lived, we are not only enjoying, but deeply understanding the true meaning of life.

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Elena and Mom

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 03/19/2016 - 23:46
Elena and Mom

Tongues out!

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Alan and Dad

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 03/19/2016 - 23:45
Alan and Dad
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Basket of toys

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 03/19/2016 - 23:45
Basket of toys
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On evolving communities and changing social practices

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 10/08/2015 - 18:25

I will join Lars and Tincho in stating this, and presenting a version contrary to what Norbert portraits.

I am very glad and very proud that the community I am most involved in, the Debian project, has kept its core identity over the years, at least for the slightly-over-a-decade I have been involved in it. And I am very glad and very proud that being less aggressive, more welcoming and in general more respectful to each other does not counter this.

When I joined Debian, part of the mantra chants we had is that in order to join a Free Software project you had to grow a thick skin, as sooner or later we'd all be exposed to flamefests. But, yes, the median age of the DD was way lower back then — I don't have the data at hand, but IIRC I have always been close to our median. Which means we are all growing old and grumpy. But old and wiser.

A very successful, important and dear subproject to many of us is the Debian Women Project. Its original aim was, as the name shows, to try to reduce the imbalance between men and women participants in Debian — IIRC back in 2004 we had 3 female DDs, and >950 male DDs. Soon, the project started morphing into pushing all of Debian to be less hostile, more open to contributions from any- and everyone (as today our diversity statement reads).

And yes, we are still a long, long, long way from reaching equality. But we have done great steps. And not just WRT women, but all of the different minorities, as well as to diverging opinions within our community. Many people don't enjoy us abiding by a code of conduct; I also find it irritating sometimes to have to abide by certain codes if we mostly know each other and know we won't be offended by a given comment... Or will we?

So, being more open and more welcoming also means being more civil. I cannot get myself to agree with Linus' quote, when he says that respect is not just given to everybody but must be earned. We should always start, and I enjoy feeling that in Debian this is becoming the norm, by granting respect to everybody — And not losing it, even if things get out of hand. Thick skins are not good for communication.

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180

Submitted by gwolf on Fri, 08/28/2015 - 11:09

180 degrees — people say their life has changed by 180° whenever something alters their priorities, their viewpoints, their targets in life.

In our case, it's been 180 days. 183 by today, really. The six most amazing months in my life.

We are still the same people, with similar viewpoints and targets. Our priorities have clearly shifted.

But our understanding of the world, and our sources of enjoyment, and our outlook for the future... Are worlds apart. Not 180°, think more of a quantic transposition.

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Feeling somewhat special

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 05/19/2015 - 18:36

Today I feel more special than I have ever felt.

Or... Well, or something like that.

Thing is, there is no clear adjective for this — But I successfully finished my Specialization degree! Yes, believe it or not, today I can formally say I am Specialist in Informatic Security and Information Technologies (Especialista en Seguridad Informática y Tecnologías de la Información), as awarded by the Higher School of Electric and Mechanic Engineering (Escuela Superior de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica) of the National Polytechnical Institute (Instituto Politécnico Nacional).

In Mexico and most Latin American countries, degrees are usually incorporated to your name as if they were a nobiliary title. Thus, when graduating from Engineering studies (pre-graduate universitary level), I became "Ingeniero Gunnar Wolf". People graduating from further postgraduate programs get to introduce themselves as "Maestro Foobar Baz" or "Doctor Quux Noox". And yes, a Specialization is a small posgraduate program (I often say, the smallest possible posgraduate). And as a Specialist... What can I brag about? Can say I am Specially Gunnar Wolf? Or Special Gunnar Wolf? Nope. The honorific title for a Specialization is a pointer to null, and when casted into a char* it might corrupt your honor-recognizing function. So I'm still Ingeniero Gunnar Wolf, for information security reasons.

So that's the reason I am now enrolled in the Masters program. I hope to write an addenda to this message soonish (where soonish ≥ 18 months) saying I'm finally a Maestro.

As a sidenote, many people asked me: Why did I take on the specialization, which is a degree too small for most kinds of real work recognition? Because it's been around twenty years since I last attended a long-term scholar program as a student. And my dish is quite full with activities and responsabilities. I decided to take a short program, designed for 12 months (I graduated in 16, minus two months that the university was on strike... Quite good, I'd say ;-) ) to see how I fared on it, and only later jumping on the full version.

Because, yes, to advance my career at the university, I finally recognized and understood that I do need postgraduate studies.

Oh, and what kind of work did I do for this? Besides the classes I took, I wrote a thesis on a model for evaluating covert channels for establishing secure communications.

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