Mexico

Everybody seems to have an opinion on the taxis vs. Uber debate...

Submitted by gwolf on Wed, 05/13/2015 - 23:46

The discussion regarding the legality and convenience of Uber, Cabify and similar taxi-by-app services has come to Mexico City — Over the last few days, I've seen newspapers talk about taxi drivers demonstrating against said companies, early attempts at regulating their service, and so on.

I hold the view that every member of a society should live by its accepted rules (i.e. laws) — and if they hold the laws as incorrect, unfair or wrong, they should strive to get the laws to change. Yes, it's a hard thing to do, most often filled with resistence, but it's the only socially responsible way to go.

Private driver hiring applications have several flaws, but maybe the biggest one is that they are... How to put it? I cannot find a word better than illegal. Taxi drivers in our city (and in most cities, as far as I have read) undergo a long process to ensure they are fit for the task. Is the process incomplete? Absolutely. But the answer is not to abolish it in the name of the free market. The process must be, if anything, tightened. The process for granting a public driver license to an individual is way stricter than to issue me a driving license (believe it or not, Mexico City abolished taking driving tests several years ago). Taxis do get physical and mechanical review — Is their status mint and perfect? No way. But compare them to taxis in other Mexican states, and you will see they are in general in a much better shape.

Now... One of the things that angered me most about the comments to articles such as the ones I'm quoting is the middle class mentality they are written from. I have seen comments ranging from stupidly racist humor attempts (Mr. Mayor, the Guild of Kidnappers and Robbers of Iztapalapa demand the IMMEDIATE prohibition on UBER as we are running low on clients or the often repeated comment that taxi drivers are (...) dirty, armpit-smelly that listen to whatever music they want) to economic culture-based discrimination Uber is just for credit card users as if it were enough of an argument... Much to the opposite, it's just discrimination, as many people in this city are not credit subjects and do not exist in the banking system, or cannot have an always-connected smartphone — Should they be excluded from the benefits of modernity just because of their economic difference?

And yes, I'm by far not saying Mexico City's taxi drivers are optimal. I am an urban cyclist, and my biggest concern/fear are usually taxi drivers (more so than microbus drivers, which are a class of their own). Again , as I said at the beginning of the post, I am of the idea that if current laws and their enforcement are not enough for a society, it has to change due to that society's pressure — It cannot just be ignored because nobody follows the rules anyway. There is quite a bit that can be learnt from Uber's ways, and there are steps that can be taken by the company to become formal and legal, in our country and in others where they are accused of the same lacking issues.

We all deserve better services. Not just those of us that can pay for a smartphone and are entitled to credit cards. And all passenger-bearing services require strict regulations.

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The Conquest of Energy (detail)

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
The Conquest of Energy (detail)

Mural on the Antonio Caso auditorium (originally, Sciences Faculty)

Revolutionary figures

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Revolutionary figures

On the Central Library walls, Ciudad Universitaria

The atom and nature

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
The atom and nature

On the walls of the National Library

Selene snaps a picture

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Selene snaps a picture

By the bike road in Las Islas, Ciudad Universitaria

Selene, Regina and Michelle

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Selene, Regina and Michelle

In Las Islas, Ciudad Universitaria

Copernician cosmovision

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Copernician cosmovision

On the walls of the Central Library

Ptolemaic cosmovision

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Ptolemaic cosmovision

On the walls of the Central Library

UNAM. Viva México, viva en paz.

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
UNAM. Viva México, viva en paz.

We have had terrible months in Mexico; I don't know how much has appeared about our country in the international media. The last incidents started on the last days of September, when 43 students at a school for rural teachers were forcefully disappeared (in our Latin American countries, this means they were taken by force and no authority can yet prove whether they are alive or dead; forceful disappearance is one of the saddest and most recognized traits of the brutal military dictatorships South America had in the 1970s) in the Iguala region (Guerrero state, South of the country) and three were killed on site. An Army regiment was stationed few blocks from there and refused to help.

And yes, we live in a country where (incredibly) this news by themselves would not seem so unheard of... But in this case, there is ample evidence they were taken by the local police forces, not by a gang of (assumed) wrongdoers. And they were handed over to a very violent gang afterwards. Several weeks later, with far from a thorough investigation, we were told they were killed, burnt and thrown to a river.

The Iguala city major ran away, and was later captured, but it's not clear why he was captured at two different places. The Guerrero state governor resigned and a new governor was appointed. But this was not the result of a single person behaving far from what their voters would expect — It's a symptom of a broken society where policemen will kill when so ordered, where military personnel will look away when pointed out to the obvious, where the drug dealers have captured vast regions of the country where are stronger than the formal powers.

And then, instead of dealing with the issue personally as everybody would expect, the president goes on a commercial mission to China. Oh, to fix some issues with a building company. That coincidentally or not was selling a super-luxury house to his wife. A house that she, several days later, decided to sell because it was tarnishing her family's honor and image.

And while the president is in China, the person who dealt with the social pressure and told us about the probable (but not proven!) horrible crime where the "bad guys" for some strange and yet unknown reason (even with tens of them captured already) decided to kill and burn and dissolve and disappear 43 future rural teachers presents his version, and finishes his speech saying that "I'm already tired of this topic".

Of course, our University is known for its solidarity with social causes; students in our different schools are the first activists in many protests, and we have had a very tense time as the protests are at home here at the university. This last weekend, supposed policemen entered our main campus with a stupid, unbelievable argument (they were looking for a phone reported as stolen three days earlier), get into an argument with some students, and end up firing shots at the students; one of them was wounded in the leg.

And the university is now almost under siege: There are policemen surrounding us. We are working as usual, and will most likely finish the semester with normality, but the intimidation (in a country where seeing a policeman is practically never a good sign) is strong.

And... Oh, I could go on a lot. Things feel really desperate and out of place.

Today I will join probably tens or hundreds of thousands of Mexicans sick of this simulation, sick of this violence, in a demonstration downtown. What will this achieve? Very little, if anything at all. But we cannot just sit here watching how things go from bad to worse. I do not accept to live in a state of exception.

So, this picture is just right: A bit over a month ago, two dear friends from Guadalajara city came, and we had a nice walk in the University. Our national university is not only huge, it's also beautiful and loaded with sights. And being so close to home, it's our favorite place to go with friends to show around. This is a fragment of the beautiful mural in the Central Library. And, yes, the University stands for "Viva México". And the university stands for "Peace". And we need it all. Desperately.

Great UNAM logo

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Great UNAM logo

On the wall of the Central Library. Note that it still mentions "Universidad Nacional de México" (not mentioning "Autónoma")

Central Library, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Central Library, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Selene, Regina and Michelle

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Selene, Regina and Michelle

Having a nice walk in Ciudad Universitaria

Quetzalcóatl bas-relief in the entrance to the Central Library

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Quetzalcóatl bas-relief in the entrance to the Central Library

Siberian dogs strolling in Ciudad Universitaria

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Siberian dogs strolling in Ciudad Universitaria

Siberian dog strolling in Ciudad Universitaria

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 11/20/2014 - 13:38
Siberian dog strolling in Ciudad Universitaria
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