operating systems

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The students following Kaz's explanation of ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
The students following Kaz's explanation of ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

The students following Kaz's explanation of ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
The students following Kaz's explanation of ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Little piece of the ext4 explanation

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Little piece of the ext4 explanation

After the projector blew up at the beginning of the class, all of the exposition had to be directly in Kaz's laptop screen...

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

Following the source code in his laptop screen, with ~10 eager students following from behind

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Kaz explaining ext4

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 16:34
Kaz explaining ext4

A full group of students following on Kaz's thorough explanation

Guest class: César Yáñez (@caesarcomptus) talks about virtual memory

Submitted by gwolf on Sat, 05/17/2014 - 15:05

Shame on me... I should have uploaded this video a long time ago. I wanted to edit this video to remove pauses, add some in-band indications on who and what it is, and stuff... But after a month, I have not yet got around to do it.

On April 23, I invited César Yáñez to present a talk on virtual memory management to my students (for the Operating Systems class). As always (this is the third time I invite him — The previous iteration was on process scheduling, and is on my site as well), he gave a great class.

I still have some pending videos to upload from the other guests we had this semester, they should come shortly.

César Yáñez (@caesarcomptus) in the classroom: Process scheduling

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 10/13/2013 - 21:34

I try to have some guests every now and then to my Operating Systems class. The class is not as practical/interactive as I'd like, and having some people show the students how the subjects I teach are reflected in the real world is, I feel, very useful for them to understand the topics' importance.

The past semester (the first one for me) I had three guests: Chema Serralde, talking about process scheduling and in particular on the importance of real time, from his perspective as a musician, Rolando Cedillo, talking about the early stages of the boot process, and César Yáñez, giving a review of file systems. This semester, there have been two guests so far: Felipe Esquivel, who spoke about parallelism, and used renders with Blender to illustrate the speed gains and limitations (i.e. Amdahl's law), and this last Thursday, I invited again César Yáñez. César spoke about process scheduling, first giving a quite thorough review of what had taken me at least three sessions to go through, and second, giving some in-depth review based on his experience with Haiku OS.

What else was different this time? I told our coordinator in the faculty, and she invited the other teachers of the subject (and attended herself). So, instead of the usual ~25 students, we have ~40 people in the classroom. And one of them, Adolfo, recorded most of César's explanation. Yay!

Of course, I asked Adolfo for a copy of his recording, and recoded it in a format more suitable for Web viewing. Here it is (almost 300MB, Ogg Video, ~95 minutes). I still have the original video file given to me, in an Apple-generated badly-compressed .mov, but at over 1.5GB, it's too much for a Web download. I will try to record future sessions, as they will surely be useful!

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