Conferences

One month later: How is the set of Debian keyrings faring?

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 09/22/2014 - 13:13

OK, it's almost one month since we (the keyring-maintainers) gave our talk at DebConf14; how are we faring regarding key transitions since then? You can compare the numbers (the graphs, really) to those in our DC14 presentation.

Since the presentation, we have had two keyring pushes:

First of all, the Non-uploading keyring is all fine: As it was quite recently created, and as it is much smaller than our other keyrings, it has no weak (1024 bit) keys. It briefly had one in 2010-2011, but it's long been replaced.

Second, the Maintainers keyring: In late July we had 222 maintainers (170 with >=2048 bit keys, 52 with weak keys). By the end of August we had 221: 172 and 49 respectively, and by September 18 we had 221: 175 and 46.

As for the Uploading developers, in late July we had 1002 uploading developers (481 with >=2048 bit keys, 521 with weak keys). By the end of August we had 1002: 512 and 490 respectively, and by September 18 we had 999: 531 and 468.

Please note that these numbers do not say directly that six DMs or that 50 uploading DDs moved to stronger keys, as you'd have to factor in new people being added, keys migrating between different keyrings (mostly DM⇒DD), and people retiring from the project; you can get the detailed information looking at the public copy of our Git repository, particularly of its changelog.

And where does that put us?

Of course, I'm very happy to see that the lines in our largest keyring have already crossed. We now have more people with >=2048 bit keys. And there was a lot of work to do this processing done! But that still means... That in order not to lock a large proportion of Debian Developers and Maintainers out of the project, we have a real lot of work to do. We would like to keep the replacement slope high (because, remember, in January 1st we will remove all small keys from the keyring).

And yes, we are willing to do the work. But we need you to push us for it: We need you to get a new key created, to gather enough (two!) DD signatures in it, and to request a key replacement via RT.

So, by all means: Do keep us busy!

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Correction for @osupiita

Submitted by gwolf on Mon, 05/05/2014 - 12:37

I was invited to give a talk at a local conference, OS-UPIITA. I have been invited to this conference before, and will gladly be there again. But I was recently pointed at the invitation poster they are distributing (which I reproduce here for your convenience) — And I must make a couple of corrections here:

  1. First and foremost: I don't want to trick anybody. I am not the Director of Debian Mexico. In fact, Debian Mexico does not exist. I am just a humble Debian Developer.
  2. I accept the conference title, because that's what they requested from me. I'm trying to come up with a coherent exposition, but whoever knows me must be perfectly aware that I don't know (nor really care about) how to make money with Free Software. I have lived all of my professional life thanks to Free Software, but I'm against the entrepenurial culture. I will talk about my vision, of course, so if you want to hear me rant, you are invited to join us ;-)
  3. I specifically asked the organizing committee by mid-April, when they gave me the talk title, to replace "Open Source" with "Free Software" in my talk. Even though the conference is called "OS UPIITA" (as it is the Open Source conference in the UPIITA unit of Instituto Politécnico Nacional), I cannot identify with the Open Source monkier. And if we are talking about a deeply ideological issue, which is the case here, I request to use the name I can relate with. For my talk only, of course.

</rant>

But anyway, I will be very happy to be there, and believe me, am working to come up with a good talk.

OS-UPIITA friends: Please correct your online banners carrying this wrong data.

[update] OS-UPIITA changed the poster! I'm just keeping this one for the memory ;-)

[update 2] I was there, and gave the talk. And it was even a success, yay! \o/ Care to see it? Here is the presented material.

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DrupalCamp starting in 5... 4... 3... 2... ( → #DrupalCampMX )

Submitted by gwolf on Wed, 04/23/2014 - 09:26

Ok, so the day has come: Today begins the much awaited Drupal Camp Mexico City, yay!

For those that cannot make it to Mexico City, I understand understood1 we would have live streaming of at least one of the rooms, but anyway, talks will be recorded, and will be put online later on.

As for the talks schedule, here you have it. Yes, today my workmate and I will be giving a simple introduction to having a useful basic Drupal install. Today is the tutorials / workshops / BoF / hackathon day, and Thursday and Friday will be the more traditional talks days. Several of the talks on Thursday are grouped under the SymfonyDay track and will refer to the framework that serves as a base for Drupal 8.

Anyway, for the Tweetheads among the readers of this post, I understand information will flow under the #DrupalCampMX tag.

  • 1. I cannot find the link to the information, but it might appear later on... /mehopes
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DrupalCamp Mexico City: April 23-25

Submitted by gwolf on Thu, 04/03/2014 - 08:30

We are organizing a DrupalCamp in Mexico City!

DrupalCamp Mexico City logo

As a Drupal user, I have so far attended two DrupalCamps (one in Guadalajara, Mexico, and one in Guatemala, Guatemala). They are –as Free Software conferences usually are– great, informal settings where many like-minded users and developers meet and exchange all kinds of contacts, information, and have a good time.

Torre de Ingeniería

Torre de Ingeniería, UNAM

This year, I am a (minor) part of the organizing team. DrupalCamp will be held in Torre de Ingeniería, UNAM — Just by Facultad de Ingeniería, where I teach. A modern, beautiful building in Ciudad Universitaria.

Talks, tracks

So, who is this for? You can go look at the accepted sessions, you will find there is a lot of ground. Starting from the very introduction to how Drupal is structured and some tips on how to work with it (delivered by yours truly), through workflows for specific needs, to strong development-oriented talks. The talks are structured along four tracks: "Training", "Theming", "Development", "Business" and "SymfonyDay".

"SymfonyDay"? Yes.

Drupal is a fast-evolving Free Software project. Most users are currently using versions 6 and 7, which are as different between each other as day and night... But the upcoming Drupal 8 brings even greater changes. One of the most interesting changes I can see is that Drupal will now be based on a full MVC framework, Symfony. One of the days of our DrupalCamp will be devoted to Symfony (dubbed the Symfony Day).

...And... Again, just look at the list of talks. You will find a great amount of speakers interested in coming here. Not just from Mexico City. Not just from Mexico. Not just from Latin America. I must say I am personally impressed.

Sponsors!

Of course, as with any volunteer-run conferences: We are still looking for sponsors. We believe being a DrupalCamp sponsor will greatly increase your brand visibility in the community you want to work with. There are still a lot of expenses to cover to make this into all that we want. And surely, you want to be a part of this great project. There are many sponsor levels — Surely you can be part of it!

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Talking in Paraná: Free Software philosophy / the Debian project. PS: Want to contribute?

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 11/10/2013 - 20:46

I'm very happy: I was finally able to present a talk at a Free Software conference in Paraná, Argentina — Regina's hometown. Not only in Paraná, but at the Vieja Usina culture center, half a block away from her parents' house. So, I must doubly thank Laura: First, for letting us know there would be a Free Software conference there, and second, for taking some pictures :-}

What was this conference? Conferencia Regional de Software Libre, organized by Grupo de Usuarios de GNU/Linux de Entre Ríos (GUGLER). Of course, flying to Argentina (and more specifically, to Paraná, which is ~500Km away from the international airport) just for a one day conference was out of the question — So I gave the talk by videoconference. Of course, given we will be travelling for the December vacations to Argentina, I expect to meet in person the GUGLER guys soon.

I gave a single talk, mixing together two different topics: (my very personal take on) the Free Software philosophy and Debian's place in the Free Software universe. I had a very good time giving the talk, and while I was unable to look at my audience, I got reports saying they were happy and interested. I even got some mails from them, which makes me quite happy ;-)

Now, one of the recurring points whenever I talk about Debian: I often tell people that I cannot tell them why they should use Debian instead of other distributions. My years testing every distribution I come across are long gone, and I nowadays am familiar with Debian only. But I also tell them that personally I gain nothing by having more Debian users in the world — What I want to achieve is the next logical step: To have more people contributing to Debian. So, here is a great opportunity for interested people, specifically a group that often has a hard time finding a way to collaborate with Free Software projects.

Today, Paul Tagliamonte published a call for proposals for Debian 8 (Jessie)'s artwork. So, given many people always want to find a way to contribute to Free Software without being a coder, here's a golden opportunity. You can look at the themes sent for Debian 7 as a reference; look also at the technical requirements for your artwork, and... Well, you have until early February to work on it!

After Debian's 20th birthday, everybody's life gets back to normality...

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 08/18/2013 - 21:37

As I slowly read my good friends wishing each other a good trip, telling they got home safely, and the IRC channels form thick drops of a bitter-sweet etheral substance, I cannot help feeling DebConf13 is over — For me as well, from the distance. Many friends gave me warm greetings, and without being there, gave me that beautiful feeling of real community that Debian has given me for ten years already, since I met in real-life many of its developers at DebConf3 in Oslo. And –yes, I have stated this far too many times– I have attended every DebConf since (and worked organizing most of them). This year, over 300 people were gathered in Switzerland to enjoy the always most intense weeks of the year.

This year, I was unable to attend due to calendar clashes. Even so, without the stress that organizers have, and thanks to the great work of the always-loved Video Team, I think I was able to be present at more sessions than at in any of the last few years. Oh, and for the readers of this blog who were not there — Do you want to follow what was presented? You can download already the videos for all of the recorded presentations (that were, due to the planned coverage and the manageable size of the Video Team, about ⅔ of the total scheduled sessions). And, as always, I was able to follow many very interesting talks and take part of a couple interesting meetings/BoF sessions. I still have a bit of catchup, partly due to the timezone difference (I was only at one of the sessions during the Swiss morning, at 02:30 local time, the pkg-ruby-extras team BoF).

Anyway... Not being there, I surely was an avid consumer of the photos posted in the DebConf13 gallery, and will surely follow it for some more time as some of you upload your pending material. It was clear from the beginning that, no matter what your definition of consensus is, the chosen venue was beautiful. A beautiful place between the lake and the mountains where our sportiest guys had a very good share of morning runs, cycling sessions, competition sports of different types, outright plain fun for attendees of all sizes and all species...

But, hey, wait! During a chat in the course of DebConf, a friend told me a bit worried that all this beauty and fun might make our dear and very important sponsors they are paying for a geek vacation, is it so? No, not at all. Not by a long stretch. And just looking at those same galleries makes it clear and obvious. After all, it's widely known that Debian is the operating system for the gurus. Simple: It's impossible to have all those geeks without getting amazing work done, in ways that even seem clichés (this last photo had Joey Hess explaining dpkg format version 3.0 (git) ideas, sketched after waking up at 3AM on the first sketching surface available to him). After all, Debian people are famous for their inclination to use any excuse to open their computers and hack away. We can find Debianers hacking in small spaces and also hacking out in the fields. But this time, people were able to hack indoors while enjoying the nature and hack outdoors under a tree. And, yes, one of the things that makes organizing DebConf worth it is, after ≈eleven months having low-bandwidth meetings over IRC, having the opportunity to plan for the next days face to face, in a relaxed but work-full environment.

Anyway, here at home I didn't sit idly just longing over them. How could I? We are just celebrating the Debian Project's 20th anniversary!

http://gwolf.org/content/jonathan-host-and-organizer-rancho-electr-nico">Jonathan, a Debian enthusiast, student at my university, and collaborator for several free software-related collectives in Mexico City, invited me to the celebration at Rancho Electrónico (which I recently mentioned in this same blog). While I was unable to stay for the whole celebration, we had a very good time; I talked about some ways on how to contribute to Debian. Although I didn't have much of a presentation prepared for it, I feel it was successful and interesting for the attendees — I just hope to start seeing some of them get into any of the ways for helping Debian soon. I also stayed as a listener and ocassional commenter for a talk on the Debian Project's history and goals, and to a presentation on a nifty electronic music programming tool called Supercollider (of course, available in Debian).

Now, "regular" life should continue. For some value of "regular".

At Rancho Electrónico

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 08/18/2013 - 20:35
At Rancho Electrónico

Paying attention to another presentation at Rancho Electrónico's Debian 20th anniversary celebration

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Jonathan, host and organizer at Rancho Electrónico

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 08/18/2013 - 20:32
Jonathan, host and organizer at Rancho Electrónico

Jonathan came up with a large chunk of the organization for Debian's 20th anniversary celebration at Rancho Electrónico. Thanks!

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Starting my talk for Debian's 20th birthday at Rancho Electrónico

Submitted by gwolf on Sun, 08/18/2013 - 20:26
Starting my talk for Debian's 20th birthday at Rancho Electrónico

Starting a very improvised talk at Debian 20th anniversary party at Rancho Electrónico

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Talking about Debian while Debian was getting released

Submitted by gwolf on Tue, 05/07/2013 - 11:59

Last Saturday, I was invited to talk about Debian to Hackerspace DF, a group that is starting to work at a very nice place together with other collectives, in a quite centric place (Colonia Obrera). I know several of the people in the group (visited them a couple of times in the space's previous incarnation), and wish them great luck in this new hackerspace!

Anyway — I was invited to give an informal talk about Debian. And of course, I was there. And so was Alfredo, who recorded (most of) it.

So, in case you want to see me talking about how Debian works, mostly on a social organization level (but also regarding some technical details). Of course, given the talk was completely informal (it started by me standing there, asking, "OK, any questions?"), I managed to mix up some names and stuff... But I hope that, in the end, the participants understood better what Debian means than when we started.

Oh, and by the end of the talk, we were all much happier. Not only because I was about to shut up, but because during my talk, we got notice that Debian 7.0 "Wheezy" was released.

Anyway — If you want to see me talking for ~1hr, you can download the video or watch it on YouTube.

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