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Gunnar Wolf - Nice grey life

Showing posts 1 – 10

DebConf24 Continuous Key-Signing Party
🎉🥳🤡🎂🍥 Yay, party! 🎉🥳🤡🎂🍥 🎉🥳🤡🎂🍥 Yay, crypto! 🎉🥳🤡🎂🍥 DebCamp has started, and in a couple of days, we will fully be in DebConf24 mode! As most of you know, an important part that binds Debian together is our cryptographic identity assurance, and that is in good measure tightened by the Continuous Key-Signing Parties we hold at DebConfs and other Debian and Free Software gatherings. As I have done during (most of) the past DebConfs, I have prepared a set of pseudo-social maps to help you find where you are in the OpenPGP mesh of our conference. Naturally, Web-of-Trust maps should...

Script for weather reporting in Waybar
While I was living in Argentina, we (my family) found ourselves checking for weather forecasts almost constantly — weather there can be quite unexpected, much more so that here in Mexico. So it took me a bit of tinkering to come up with a couple of simple scripts to show the weather forecast as part of my Waybar setup. I haven’t cared to share with anybody, as I believe them to be quite trivial and quite dirty. But today, Víctor was asking for some slightly-related things, so here I go. Please do remember I warned: Dirty. I am using OpenWeather’s...

Scholarly spam • «Wulfenia»
I just got one of those utterly funny spam messages… And yes, I recognize everybody likes building a name for themselves. But some spammers are downright silly. I just got the following mail: From: Hermine Wolf <hwolf850@gmail.com> To: me, obviously 😉 Date: Mon, 15 Jul 2024 22:18:58 -0700 Subject: Make sure that your manuscript gets indexed and showcased in the prestigious Scopus database soon. Message-ID: <CAEZZb3XCXSc_YOeR7KtnoSK4i3OhD=FH7u+A5xSMsYvhQZojQA@mail.gmail.com> This message has visual elements included. If they don't display, please update your email preferences. *Dear Esteemed Author,* Upon careful examination of your recent research articles available online, we are excited to invite you...

Many terabytes for students to play with. Thanks Debian!
My students at LIDSOL (Laboratorio de Investigación y Desarrollo de Software Libre, Free Software Research and Development Lab) at Facultad de Ingeniería, UNAM asked me to help them get the needed hardware to set up a mirror for various free software projects. We have some decent servers (not new servers, but mirrors don’t require to be top-performance), so… A couple of weeks ago, I approached the Debian Project Leader (DPL) and suggested we should buy two 16TBhard drives for this project, as it is the most reasonable cost per byte point I found. He agreed, and I bought the drives....

Find my device - Whether you like it or not
I received a mail today from Google (noreply-findmydevice@google.com) notifying me that they would unconditionally enable the Find my device functionality I have been repeatedly marking as unwanted in my Android phone. The mail goes on to explain this functionality works even when the device is disconnected, by Bluetooth signals (aha, so “turn off Bluetooth” will no longer turn off Bluetooth? Hmmm…) Of course, the mail hand-waves that only I can know the location of my device. «Google cannot see or use it for other ends». First, should we trust this blanket statement? Second, the fact they don’t do it now…...

A new RISC-V toy... requiring almost no tinkering
Shortly before coming back from Argentina, I got news of a very interesting set of little machines, the MilkV Duo. The specs looked really interesting and fun to play with, particularly those of the “bigger” model, Milk-V DUO S Some of the highlights: The SG2000 SoC is a Dual-architecture beast. A hardware switch controls whether the CPU is an ARM or a RISC-V. Not only that: It has a second (albeit lesser) RISC-V core that can run independently. They mention this computer can run simultaneously Linux and FreeRTOS! 512MB RAM Sweet form factor (4.2×4.2cm) Peeking around their Web site, it...

How computers make books • from graphics rendering, search algorithms, and functional programming to indexing and typesetting
If we look at the age-old process of creating books, how many different areas can a computer help us with? And how can each of them be used to teach computer science (CS) fundamentals to a nontechnical audience? This is the premise of John Whitington’s enticing book and the result is quite amazing. The book immediately drew my attention when looking at the titles available for review. After all, my initiation into computing as a kid was learning the LaTeX typesetting system while my father worked on his first book on scientific language and typography [1]. Whitington picks 11 different...

Hacks, leaks, and revelations • The art of analyzing hacked and leaked data
Imagine you’ve come across a trove of files documenting a serious deed and you feel the need to “blow the whistle.” Or maybe you are an investigative journalist and this whistleblower trusts you and wants to give you said data. Or maybe you are a technical person, trusted by said journalist to help them do things right–not only to help them avoid being exposed while leaking the information, but also to assist them in analyzing the contents of the dataset. This book will be a great aid for all of the above tasks. The author, Micah Lee, is both a...

Think outside the box • Welcome Eclipse!
Now that we are back from our six month period in Argentina, we decided to adopt a kitten, to bring more diversity into our lives. Perhaps this little girl will teach us to think outside the box! Yesterday we witnessed a solar eclipse — Mexico City was not in the totality range (we reached ~80%), but it was a great experience to go with the kids. A couple dozen thousand people gathered for a massive picnic in las islas, the main area inside our university campus. Afterwards, we went briefly back home, then crossed the city to fetch the little...

After miniDebConf Santa Fe
Last week we held our promised miniDebConf in Santa Fe City, Santa Fe province, Argentina — just across the river from Paraná, where I have spent almost six beautiful months I will never forget. Around 500 Kilometers North from Buenos Aires, Santa Fe and Paraná are separated by the beautiful and majestic Paraná river, which flows from Brazil, marks the Eastern border of Paraguay, and continues within Argentina as the heart of the litoral region of the country, until it merges with the Uruguay river (you guessed right — the river marking the Eastern border of Argentina, first with Brazil...


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